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Wan Qichang, Bai Lin, Zhao Gege, Zhang Youjia, Ma Qingjie, Wang Renjie and Ji Bin

Purpose

To evaluate the accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for the detection of recurrent and/or metastatic diseases in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with thyroglobulin elevation and negative iodine scintigraphy. Whether PET/CT with TSH stimulation (sPET/CT) had better diagnostic performance than PET/CT without TSH stimulation (nsPET/CT) in this scenario was also evaluated.

Methods

PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies from January 2001 to December 2018. Only studies with clearly stated reference standard (histopathology confirmation and/or clinical/imaging follow-up) were included. Publication bias was assessed by Deeks funnel plot. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and the area under the summary receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) for PET/CT was determined by random-effect analysis, respectively. sPET/CT and nsPET/CT were compared pairwise for all diagnostic estimate indexes using Z-test.

Results

We included 17 studies with 1195 patients in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, DOR and AUC for PET/CT on patient-based data were 0.86 (95% CI: 0.79–0.91), 0.84 (95% CI: 0.72–0.91), 31.00 (95% CI: 12.00–80.00) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88–0.93), respectively. There was high heterogeneity (I 2 = 80% for sensitivity, I 2 = 82% for specificity) and possible publication bias (P = 0.01). Z test did not detect statistically significant difference between sPET/CT and nsPET/CT for all the diagnostic estimate indexes (all P > 0.05).

Conclusions

On patient-based analysis, 18F-FDG-PET/CT has high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of recurrent and/or metastatic diseases in DTC patients with thyroglobulin elevation and negative iodine scintigraphy, but existing studies were limited by high heterogeneity and possible publication bias. The diagnostic performance of sPET/CT may be not superior to nsPET/CT.

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Gherardo Mazziotti, Andrea G A Lania and Ernesto Canalis

Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert physiological actions on the skeleton throughout life, by stimulating longitudinal bone growth in children, the acquisition of bone mass during adolescence and the maintenance of skeletal architecture in adults. When GH and IGF-I are secreted in excess, bone remodeling is enhanced leading to deterioration of bone microstructure and impairment of bone strength. Indeed, acromegaly causes skeletal fragility, and vertebral fractures are reported in a remarkable number of subjects exposed to GH and IGF-I excess. The management of skeletal fragility in acromegaly is a challenge, since the awareness of this complication is low, the prediction of fracture risk is difficult to ascertain, the risk of fractures remains after the control of acromegaly and the effectiveness of bone-active drugs is unknown. This review is an update on bone disorders associated with acromegaly and provides a perspective of possible therapeutic approaches based on emerging pathophysiological and clinical information.

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Jens Bollerslev, Ansgar Heck and Nicoleta Cristina Olarescu

Acromegaly is a rare and challenging disease calling for management in highly specialised multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). Untreated disease has severe morbidity and a clearly increased mortality. Major attainments have been gained over the latest decades, and therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss recent achievements in modern multimodal therapy of acromegaly performed by MDTs, with an emphasis on an individualised, proactive management from the time of diagnosis to long-term outcome. Treatment by surgery is the only potential curative treatment, however, even with modern techniques still with modest cure rates, leaving the patients to often long-term medical treatment. Treatment strategies have changed dramatically in the Western world over recent years, implying a more proactive treatment algorithm often with a shorter or longer pre-surgical treatment period with somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs). Not all patients will however respond to primary treatment with conventional SRLs and there has recently been a development of potential biomarkers for response that has been implemented in the clinical routine. By today, multimodal treatment can bring every patient in remission, but still almost a third of all patients are undertreated according to large, international registries. On the other hand, it might be a challenge not to over treat thereby bringing the patient into a state of relative or absolute growth hormone deficiency. Clinical series published during the last decade on treatment of patients with acromegaly have indicated a normalisation of mortality, most probably reflecting the proactive and individualised modern treatment. In conclusion, modern, multimodal treatment seems to have normalised mortality, but still the patients suffer from a high multi-organ morbidity and often multi-pharmacy. Every patient should receive an individualised, proactive treatment in order to improve long-term outcome and to reduce costs for the society.

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Lorena Guimaraes Lima Amato, Luciana Ribeiro Montenegro, Antonio Marcondes Lerario, Alexander Augusto Lima Jorge, Gil Guerra Junior, Caroline Schnoll, Alessandra Covallero Renck, Ericka Barbosa Trarbach, Elaine Maria Frade Costa, Berenice Bilharinho Mendonca, Ana Claudia Latronico and Leticia Ferreira Gontijo Silveira

Context

Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare condition caused by GnRH deficiency. Several genes have been associated with the pathogenesis of CHH, but most cases still remain without a molecular diagnosis. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has allowed the simultaneous genotyping of several regions, faster, making possible the extension of the genetic knowledge of CHH.

Objective

Genetic characterization of a large cohort of Brazilian CHH patients.

Design and patients

A cohort of 130 unrelated patients (91 males, 39 females) with CHH (75 normosmic CHH, 55 Kallmann syndrome) was studied using a panel containing 36 CHH-associated genes.

Results

Potential pathogenic or probably pathogenic variants were identified in 43 (33%) CHH patients. The genes ANOS1, FGFR1 and GNRHR were the most frequently affected. A novel homozygous splice site mutation was identified in the GNRH1 gene and a deletion of the entire coding sequence was identified in SOX10. Deleterious variants in the IGSF10 gene were identified in two patients with reversible normosmic CHH. Notably, 6.9% of the patients had rare variants in more than one gene. Rare variants were also identified in SPRY4, IL17RD, FGF17, IGSF1 and FLRT3 genes.

Conclusions

This is a large study of the molecular genetics of CHH providing new genetic findings for this complex and heterogeneous genetic condition. NGS has been shown to be a fast, reliable and effective tool in the molecular diagnosis of congenital CHH and being able to targeting clinical genetic testing in the future.

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Woo Kyung Lee, Jandee Lee, Hyunji Kim, Seul Gi Lee, Sun Hyung Choi, Seonhyang Jeong, Hyeong Ju Kwon, Sang Geun Jung and Young Suk Jo

Objective

Tumor location in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) might determine tumor outgrowth from the thyroid gland. However, the clinical implications of tumor location and minimal extrathyroid extension (mETE) have not been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the relationship between tumor location and mETE to predict the aggressiveness of PTMC.

Methods

A total of 858 patients with PTMC were grouped according to tumor location on ultrasonography: central (cPTMC) and peripheral PTMC (pPTMC). PTMC without mETE (PTMC-mETE(−)) was divided further according to margin shape: encapsulated (E−) or infiltrative (I−). To understand the molecular biologic characteristics of PTMC presenting with an I-margin and mETE, transcriptome data from TCGA-THCA were analyzed using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA).

Results

pPTMC (n = 807, 94.1%) accounted for the majority of cases; mETE was identified only in pPTMC (403/807; 49.9%). pPTMC-mETE(+) showed aggressive clinical characteristics that increased the odds ratio (OR) for lymph node metastasis (LNM). Interestingly, subgroup analysis of PTMC-mETE(−) revealed that the I-margin also increased the OR for LNM, independent of other clinical factors. GSEA of TCGA-THCA data suggested coordinated upregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PTC with mETE. Immunohistochemical staining for laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2), CD59, E-cadherin and vimentin showed that these markers of EMT were associated with progressive changes in E-margin PTMC-mETE(−), I-margin PTMC-mETE(−) and pPTMC-mETE(+).

Conclusion

mETE related to peripheral location of PTMC is an important predictor of tumor invasiveness, as is the I-margin, which presents with EMT features similar to mETE. I-margin PTMC-mETE(−) and pPTMC-mETE(+) might reflect the pattern of invasive PTMC.

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Alena Welters, Ranna El-Khairi, Antonia Dastamani, Nadine Bachmann, Carsten Bergmann, Clare Gilbert, Emma Clement, Jane A Hurst, Nada Quercia, Jonathan D Wasserman, Thomas Meissner, Pratik Shah and Sebastian Kummer

Objective

Genetic aetiology remains unknown in up to 50% of patients with persistent hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH). Several syndromes are associated with HH. We report Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS) as one of the possible causes of persistent HH. Early diagnosis and treatment of HH is crucial to prevent hypoglycaemic brain injury.

Design

Four RSTS patients with HH were retrospectively analysed.

Methods

Genetic investigations included next-generation sequencing-based gene panels and exome sequencing. Clinical characteristics, metabolic profile during hypoglycaemia and treatment were reviewed.

Results

Disease-related EP300 or CREBBP variants were found in all patients, no pathogenic variants were found in a panel of genes associated with non-syndromic HH. Two patients had classic manifestations of RSTS, three had choanal atresia or stenosis. Diagnosis of HH varied from 1 day to 18 months of age. One patient was unresponsive to treatment with diazoxide, octreotide and nifedipine, but responded to sirolimus. All required gastrostomy feeding.

Conclusions

Given the rarity of RSTS (1:125 000) and HH (1:50 000), our observations indicate an association between these two conditions. We therefore recommend that clinicians should be vigilant in screening for HH in symptomatic infants with RSTS. In children with an apparent syndromic form of HH, RSTS should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

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Ying Sun, Jiao Fang, Yuhui Wan, Puyu Su and Fangbiao Tao

Objective

Previous finding suggests that children growing up under chronic stress tend to experience earlier sexual maturity. The present study aims to examine polygenic risk by experience interaction in predicting pubertal timing, as well as provide insight regarding the relevance of two G × E paradigms.

Design and methods

Data were analyzed from a 3-year prospective puberty cohort in Anhui Province, China. Breast Tanner stage and testicular volume (TV) of 997 children were annually assessed. The polygenic risk score (PRS) was computed based on 17 SNPs for early pubertal timing. Hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) were assessed in the first 3 cm hair segment as a biological marker of chronic stress.

Results

Comparing with participants under moderate levels of stress as measured by HCC, the puberty-accelerating effects of chronic stress were only observed among girls with moderate (1.7 months earlier, P = 0.007) and low genetic susceptibility (2.2 months earlier, P < 0.001) and among boys with high genetic susceptibility (2.0 months earlier, P = 0.005). Polygenic differences (PRSs) in age at thelarche was most prominent in those with low levels of stress by HCC (9.06, 9.36 and 9.53 years for high, moderate and low PRS, respectively; F = 105.06, P < 0.0001), while polygenic differences in age at TV ≥4 mL was strongest in those under chronic stress (10.91, 11.06 and 11.17 years for high, moderate and low PRS, respectively; F = 100.48, P < 0.0001).

Conclusion

Chronic stress predicts earlier age at pubertal onset in a sex-specific and genetic background-dependent manner. The bioecological G × E model for girls and diathesis stress model for boys in pubertal timing warrants further investigation.

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Esben T Vestergaard, Niels Møller, René Frydensbjerg Andersen, Søren Rittig and Jens Otto Lunde Jørgensen

Objective

Acyl ghrelin, which is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, potently stimulates pituitary growth hormone release, and to some degree adrenocorticotropic hormone and prolactin. Ghrelin is also orexigenic and has recently been shown to stimulate renal sodium absorption in rodent models. Increased thirst sensation has been observed as a side effect of acyl ghrelin administration in some human studies. The objective of this clinical trial was to investigate the direct effects of acyl ghrelin on thirst sensation and sodium excretion in hypopituitary patients.

Design

Hypopituitary patients on stable replacement with hydrocortisone and growth hormone were investigated in two double-blind and placebo-controlled crossover studies. The patients received a 5-h intravenous infusion of acyl ghrelin (5 pmol/kg/min in the first study and 1 pmol/kg/min in the second study). Thirst sensation was measured on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). In the second study plasma osmolality, vasopressin, copeptin, water intake, diuresis and urinary excretion of sodium and creatinine were measured.

Results

In the initial study, acyl ghrelin (5 pmol/kg/min) increased thirst sensation (time × treatment analysis of variance for the effect of acyl ghrelin infusion P = 0.003). In the second study acyl ghrelin (1 pmol/kg/min) also increased thirst (P = 0.04) but did not affect urinary excretion of either sodium or water.

Conclusions

We demonstrate that acyl ghrelin infusion increases thirst sensation, without affecting sodium excretion or diuresis in human subjects.

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Mirela Diana Ilie, Véronique Raverot, François Tronc, Alexandre Vasiljevic, Françoise Borson-Chazot and Gérald Raverot

Context

Cabergoline has been shown to have some effect in the treatment of moderate Cushing’s disease, but its effectiveness in Cushing’s syndrome of ectopic or occult origin remains to be investigated.

Case series

In this case series, cabergoline was used in combination with steroidogenesis inhibitors in nine patients with severe Cushing’s syndrome of ectopic or occult origin. Cabergoline’s effectiveness enabled rapid withdrawal of the steroidogenesis inhibitors and long-term control of the hypercortisolism in three of the cases.

Review of the literature

In the literature, we found only 11 cases of ectopic or occult Cushing’s syndrome treated with dopamine receptor agonists, alone or in combination. Yet of these 11 cases, 10 responded.

Conclusions

Although limited, the existing experience highlights the potential value of cabergoline in the treatment of ectopic or occult Cushing’s syndrome.

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Orit Twito, Simona Grozinsky-Glasberg, Sigal Levy, Gideon Bachar, David J Gross, Carlos Benbassat, Alon Rozental and Dania Hirsch

Objective

Multiple clinical, pathological and biochemical variables, including the response to initial treatment, are associated with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) prognosis. Studies that include separate analyses of familial and sporadic MTC patients followed for long period are scarce. This study evaluated the association between baseline clinico-pathologic variables and response to initial treatment and short- and long-term disease outcomes in sporadic and familial MTC.

Methods

Patients treated for MTC at four tertiary medical centers were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and pathological data were collected. The outcomes measured included disease persistence 1 year after diagnosis, disease persistence at last follow-up, disease-related mortality (DRM) and all-cause mortality.

Results

The study enrolled 193 patients (mean age: 48.9 ± 18.7, 44.7% males), of whom 18.1% were familial cases. The mean follow-up period was 10.1 ± 9.4 years (8.5 ± 8.1 in sporadic and 16.9 ± 11.6 in familial MTC). Disease persistence 1-year after diagnosis and at last follow-up was detected in 56.1 and 60.4% patients, respectively. All-cause and DRM were 28.5 and 12.6%, respectively. Extra-thyroidal extension (ETE) and distant metastases (DM) were associated with disease persistence at last follow-up. ETE and DM were also significantly associated with DRM. Complete remission 1 year after diagnosis had high correlation with no evidence of disease at last follow-up (Cramer’s V measure of association 0.884, P < 0.001) and with 100% disease-specific survival (Cramer’s V measure of association 0.38, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Apart from clinico-pathologic parameters, close correlation was found between 1-year status and long-term prognosis. These results underscore the importance of combining classical and dynamic factors for both sporadic and familial MTC prognostication and treatment decision making.