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Yuan-Yuei Chen, Tung-Wei Kao, Chung-Ching Wang, Chen-Jung Wu, Yi-Chao Zhou, and Wei-Liang Chen

Background

Cigarette smoking is a risk factor of osteoporosis and bone fracture. Tobacco smoke contains several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, we hypothesized that environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure is associated with bone loss and fracture risk. The present study examined the association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and bone turnover in the general adult population.

Methods

A total of 1408 eligible participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001–2006) were included in this cross-sectional analysis. The levels of urinary N-telopeptide and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which are biomarkers of bone resorption and formation, respectively, were assessed. Meanwhile, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure was evaluated using the concentrations of urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites. The association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposures and N-telopeptide, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels was assessed using a multivariate linear regression model.

Results

All polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites except 3-phenanthrene were significantly associated with increased N-telopeptide levels (P < 0.05) after adjustment of relevant covariables. However, no significant relationship was observed between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels. This relationship remained significant after the participants were assessed according to sex (P < 0.05). Additionally, all polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites showed a positive association with N-telopeptide levels in participants aged <60 years (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure is associated with increased bone resorption among the general adult population in the United States. Further studies must assess the potential mechanisms associated with the adverse effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure on bone loss.

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Xiong-Fei Pan, Yichao Huang, Xinping Li, Yi Wang, Yi Ye, Huan Chen, Matti Marklund, Ying Wen, Yan Liu, Huayan Zeng, Xiaorong Qi, Xue Yang, Chun-Xia Yang, Ge Liu, Robert A. Gibson, Shunqing Xu, Danxia Yu, Da Chen, Yuanyuan Li, Zhixiong Mei, An Pan, and Jason Hy Wu

Objective

We aimed to examine prospective associations between circulating fatty acids in early pregnancy and incident gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among Chinese pregnant women.

Methods

Analyses were based on two prospective nested case-control studies conducted in western China (336 GDM cases and 672 matched controls) and central China (305 cases and 305 matched controls). Fasting plasma fatty acids in early pregnancy (gestational age at enrollment: 10.4 weeks [standard deviation, 2.0]) and 13.2 weeks [1.0], respectively) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and GDM was diagnosed based on the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups criteria during 24-28 weeks of gestation. Multiple metabolic biomarkers (HOMA-IR [homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance], HbA1c, c-peptide, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin, leptin, and blood lipids) were additionally measured among 672 non-GDM controls at enrollment.

Results

Higher levels of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) 14:0 (pooled odds ratio, 1.41 for each 1-standard deviation increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.25, 1.59) and 16:0 (1.19; 1.05, 1.35) were associated with higher odds of GDM. Higher levels of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) 18:2n-6 was strongly associated with lower odds of GDM (0.69; 0.60, 0.80). In non-GDM pregnant women, higher SFAs 14:0 and 16:0 but lower n-6 PUFA 18:2n-6 were generally correlated with unfavorable metabolic profiles.

Conclusions

We documented adverse associations of 14:0 and 16:0 but a protective association of 18:2n-6 with GDM among Chinese pregnant women. Our findings highlight the distinct roles of specific fatty acids in the onset of GDM.

Free access

Feng Cai, Yi-Dan Zhang, Xiuli Zhao, Ya-Kun Yang, Si-Hai Ma, Cong-Xin Dai, Xiao-Hai Liu, Yong Yao, Ming Feng, Jun-Ji Wei, Bing Xing, Yong-Hui Jiao, Zhen-Qing Wei, Zhen-Ming Yin, Bo Zhang, Feng Gu, and Ren-Zhi Wang

Objective

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein gene (AIP) is associated with pituitary adenoma (PA). AIP has not been sequenced in East Asian PA populations, so we performed this study in a Han Chinese cohort.

Design

Our study included six familial PA pedigrees comprising 16 patients and 27 unaffected relatives, as well as 216 sporadic PA (SPA) patients and 100 unrelated healthy controls.

Methods

AIP sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA isolated from blood samples. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and microsatellite marker analyses on DNA from the paired tumor tissues were performed for loss of heterozygosity analysis.

Results

We identified three common and four rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), one intron insertion, one novel synonymous variant, four novel missense variants, and a reported nonsense mutation in three familial isolated PA (FIPA) cases from the same family. Large genetic deletions were not observed in the germline but were seen in the sporadic tumor DNA from three missense variant carriers. The prevalence of AIP pathogenic variants in PA patients here was low (3.88%), but was higher in somatotropinoma patients (9.30%), especially in young adults (≤30 years) and pediatric (≥18 years) paients (17.24% and 25.00% respectively). All AIP variant patients suffered from macroadenomas. However, the AIP mutation rate in FIPA families was low in this cohort (16.67%, 1/6 families).

Conclusion

AIP gene mutation may not be frequent in FIPA or SPA from the Han Chinese population. AIP sequencing and long-term follow-up investigations should be performed for young patients with large PAs and their families with PA predisposition.