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Free access

Christopher J Child, Daniel Conroy, Alan G Zimmermann, Whitney W Woodmansee, Eva Marie Erfurth and Leslie L Robison

Objective

Speculation remains that GH treatment is associated with increased neoplasia risk. Studies in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors suggested higher rates of second neoplasms, while cancer risk data for GH-treated and untreated hypopituitary adults have been variable. We present primary cancer risk data from the Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study (HypoCCS) with a focus on specific cancers, and assessment of recurrence rates for pituitary adenomas (PA) and craniopharyngiomas (CP).

Design

Incident neoplasms during HypoCCS were evaluated in 8418 GH-treated vs 1268 untreated patients for primary malignancies, 3668 GH-treated vs 720 untreated patients with PA history, and 956 GH-treated vs 102 untreated patients with CP history.

Methods

Using population cancer rates, standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for all primary cancers, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Neoplasm rates in GH-treated vs untreated patients were analysed after propensity score adjustment of baseline treatment group imbalances.

Results

During mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 225 primary cancers were identified in GH-treated patients, with SIR of 0.82 (95% CI 0.71–0.93). SIRs (95% CI) for GH-treated patients were 0.59 (0.36–0.90) for breast, 0.80 (0.57–1.10) for prostate, and 0.62 (0.38–0.96) for colorectal cancers. Cancer risk was not statistically different between GH-treated and untreated patients (relative risk (RR)=1.00 (95% CI 0.70–1.41), P=0.98). Adjusted RR for recurrence was 0.91 (0.68–1.22), P=0.53 for PA and 1.32 (0.53–3.31), P=0.55 for CP.

Conclusions

There was no increased risk for all-site cancers: breast, prostate or colorectal primary cancers in GH-treated patients during HypoCCS. GH treatment did not increase the risk of PA and CP recurrences.

Open access

Christopher J Child, Alan G Zimmermann, Whitney W Woodmansee, Daniel M Green, Jian J Li, Heike Jung, Eva Marie Erfurth and Leslie L Robison

Objective

GH and IGFs have mitogenic properties, causing speculation that GH treatment could increase risk of malignancy. While studies in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors have suggested a slight increase in second neoplasms, studies in GH-treated adults have been equivocal.

Design

Incidence of de novo and second cancers was evaluated in 6840 GH-treated and 940 non GH-treated adult patients in the Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study pharmacoepidemiological database.

Methods

Evident cancer cases were evaluated in the main analysis, with sensitivity analyses including probable and possible cancers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancers were calculated using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results for the USA and GLOBOCAN for all other countries.

Results

During the mean follow-up of 3.7 years/GH-treated patient, 142 evident cancer cases were identified, giving an overall SIR of 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74–1.04); 95% CIs included the value of 1.0 for each country examined. The SIR for GH-treated patients from the USA (71 cases) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.73–1.18), and for non GH-treated patients from the USA (27 cases) was 1.16 (95% CI 0.76–1.69). For GH-treated patients from the USA aged <35 years, the SIR (six cases) was 3.79 (1.39–8.26), with SIR not elevated for all other age categories; SIR for patients from the USA with childhood onset (CO) GH deficiency (GHD) was 2.74 (95% CI 1.18–5.41). The SIR for colorectal cancer in GH-treated patients (11 cases) was 0.60 (95% CI 0.30–1.08).

Conclusions

With relatively short follow-up, the overall primary cancer risk in 6840 patients receiving GH as adults was not increased. Elevated SIRs were found for subgroups in the USA cohort defined by age <35 years or CO GHD.

Free access

Whitney W Woodmansee, Alan G Zimmermann, Christopher J Child, Qi Rong, Eva Marie Erfurth, Paolo Beck-Peccoz, Werner F Blum and Leslie L Robison

Objective

Childhood cancer survivors are commonly treated with GH for GH deficiency that develops either as a result of primary malignancy or its treatment. One study – the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) – demonstrated increased risk of second neoplasm (SN) in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors compared with non-GH treated, after adjusting for key risk factors. We assessed the incidence of SN in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors in outpatient observational studies of GH replacement.

Design

Retrospective analysis of two prospective cohort studies that collected data on safety of GH replacement as prescribed in clinical practice.

Methods

Childhood cancer survivors enrolled in Eli Lilly and Company's pediatric (Genetics and Neuroendocrinology of Short Stature International Study (GeNeSIS)) and adult (Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study (HypoCCS)) observational studies of GH treatment were assessed for incidence of SN.

Results

The percentage of childhood cancer survivors treated with GH who developed a SN was 3.8% in pediatric GeNeSIS participants and 6.0% in adult HypoCCS participants. The estimated cumulative incidence of SN at 5 years of follow-up in these studies was 6.2 and 4.8% respectively.

Conclusions

The incidence of SN in GeNeSIS and HypoCCS GH-treated participants is similar to the published literature and is thus consistent with increased risk of SN in childhood cancer survivors treated with GH. As follow-up times were relatively short (<3 years), longer observation is recommended. Nevertheless, clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of increased risk of SN in childhood cancer survivors treated with GH and continue chronic surveillance.