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Torben Laursen, Birgitte Grandjean, Jens OL Jørgensen and Jens S Christiansen

Laursen T, Grandjean B, Jørgensen JOL, Christiansen JS. Bioavailability and bioactivity of three different doses of nasal growth hormone (GH) administered to GH-deflcient patients: comparison with intravenous and subcutaneous administration. Eur J Endocrinol 1996;135:309–15. ISSN 0804–4643

The current mode of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy is daily subcutaneous (sc) injections given in the evening. This schedule is unable to mimic the endogenous pulsatile pattern of GH secretion, which might be of importance for the induction of growth and other GH actions. The present study was conducted in order to study the pharmacokinetics of different doses of GH following intranasal (IN) administration and the biological activity of GH after IN administration as compared with sc and intravenous (iv) delivery. Sixteen GH-deficient patients were studied on five different occasions. On three occasions GH was administered intranasally in doses of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20IU/kg, using didecanoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine as an enhancer. On the other two occasions the patients received an sc injection (0.10IU/kg) and an iv injection (0.015IU/kg) of GH, respectively. The nasal doses and the sc injection were given in random order in a crossover design. In a double-blinded manner the subjects received the three nasal doses as one puff in each nostril. The patients received no GH treatment between the five studies or during the last week before the start of each study. Intravenous administration produced a short-lived serum GH peak value of 128.12 ± 6.71 μg/l. Peak levels were 13.98±1.63 μg/l after sc injection and 3.26±0.38. 7.07±0.80 and 8.37± 1.31 μg/l, respectively, after the three nasal doses. The peak values of the 0.05 and the 0.20IU/kg nasal doses were significantly different (p = 0.007). The mean levels obtained by the low nasal dose were significantly lower than those obtained with the medium (p < 0.001) and the high dose (p < 0.001). while there was no significant difference between the medium and the high doses. The absolute bioavailability of GH following sc relative to iv administration was 49.5%. The bioavailabilities of the nasal doses were: 7.8% (0.05 IU), 8.9% (0.10 IU) and 3.8% (0.20 IU). Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels increased significantly after sc administration only. Mean levels were significantly higher after sc administration as compared with the iv and all three nasal does (p < 0.001). Serum IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels remained unchanged on all five occasions. Mean serum IGFBP-1 levels were significantly lower after sc GH injection than after administration of the iv (p < 0.001) and the three nasal doses (p < 0.005). Subcutaneous GH administration resulted in significantly higher levels of serum insulin and blood glucose (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the bioavailability of nasal GH was low (3.8–8.9%). An iv bolus injection of, on average, 1 IU of GH induced no metabolic response. Only sc GH administration induced increased levels of IGF-I, insulin and glucose. These data reveal that a closer imitation of the physiological GH pulses than achieved by sc GH administration is of limited importance for the induction of a metabolic response to GH.

Torben Laursen, Medical Department M (Diabetes & Endocrinology), Aarhus Kommunehospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C. Denmark

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Torben Laursen, Jens OL Jorgensen, Hans Ørskov, Jens Møller, Alan G Harris and Jens S Christiansen

Animal studies have demonstrated that in addition to inhibiting growth hormone (GH) secretion octreotide inhibits in a direct manner hepatic or peripheral insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation. To test this hypothesis in humans we studied ten GH-deficient patients with frequent blood sampling during 38 h on two occasions. Regular GH therapy was discontinued 72 h prior to each study period. At the start of each study a subcutaneous (sc) injection of GH (3 IU/m2) was given (at 18.00 h). In a single-blinded crossover design, patients received a continuous sc infusion of either octerotide (200 μg/24 h) or placebo (saline). The pharmacokinetics of GH were similar on the two occasions. The area under the curve±sem of serum GH was 142.5±53.6 μg·l−1·h−1 (octreotide) and 144.8±41.8 μg·l−1·h−1 (placebo), (p=0.73); Cmax (μg/l) was 12.5±1.47 (octreotide) and 12.8±1.42 (placebo) (p=0.83), and Tmax (h) was 6.1±0.97 (octreotide) and 5.2±0.65 (placebo) (p=0.49). Growth hormone administration was associated with an increase in serum IGF-I (μg/l), which was identical during the two studies, from 85.3±19.4 to 174.25±30.3 for octreotide and from 97.0±26.4 to 158.8±28.2 for placebo. Mean IGF-I levels (μg/l) were 138.2±25.1 (octreotide) and 134.5±28.6 (placebo) (p=0.78). Similarly, the increase in IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels was identical. Mean IGFBP-3 levels (μg/l) were 2303±323 (octreotide) and 2200±361 (placebo) (p=0.25). Mean insulin levels were significantly lower during octreotide treatment (39.9±17.9 mU/l) than during placebo (59.7±17.8 mU/l) (p<0.05). Mean blood glucose levels were elevated significantly during octreotide infusion (5.98±0.23 mmol/l for octreotide and 5.07±0.16 mmol/l for placebo; p=0.001). Glucagon levels decreased non-significantly (p=0.07) and IGFBP-1 levels tended to increase during infusion of octreotide although not significantly (p=0.41). Levels of the lipid intermediates were identical on the two occasions. Alanine and lactate levels were significantly increased during octreotide infusion. Mean levels of blood alanine (μmol/l) were 470.8±24.2 (octreotide) and 360.1±17.8 (placebo) (p<0.02). Mean levels of blood lactate were 1038±81.0 (octreotide) and 894.4±73.8 (placebo) (p<0.04). We conclude that short-term continuous sc infusion of octreotide has no direct effect on the generation of IGF-I or the pharmacokinetics of exogenous GH in GH-deficient man.

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Inge Bülow Pedersen, Peter Laurberg, Nils Knudsen, Torben Jørgensen, Hans Perrild, Lars Ovesen and Lone Banke Rasmussen

Background: Thyroid autoimmunity is more common in females than in males. One possible explanation for this female preponderance may be the effect of oestrogens on the immune system. It has also been suggested that foetal microchimerism involving transfer of foetal cells into maternal tissue during pregnancy may play an important role.

Objective: We investigated the association between the presence of circulating thyroid autoantibodies and previous pregnancy, parity and the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in a population cohort.

Methods: We examined 3712 women randomly selected from the general population. Serum was analysed for thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and thyroglobulin antibody (Tg-Ab) using assays based on an RIA technique (DYNO test). Data were analysed in logistic regression models to adjust for possible confounders. Women previously treated for thyroid disease or with pregnancy within 1 year prior to the study were excluded from the analyses.

Results: In both univariate and multivariate models and whether the presence of TPO-Ab and Tg-Ab was investigated alone or in combination, findings were negative with respect to an association between circulating thyroid antibodies and previous pregnancy, number of pregnancies, parity and previous abortion. There was no association between thyroid autoantibodies and use of OCs. Women aged 60–65 years receiving HRT now or previously had a lower prevalence of Tg-Ab (univariate, P = 0.01; multivariate, P = 0.02). No such association was observed between HRT and TPO-Ab.

Conclusion: In this population study there was no association between previous pregnancy, parity and thyroid antibodies, which argues against the role of microchimerism as a trigger of thyroid autoimmunity. Exogenous oestrogens may reduce aspects of autoimmunity.

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Inge Bülow Pedersen, Peter Laurberg, Nils Knudsen, Torben Jørgensen, Hans Perrild, Lars Ovesen and Lone Banke Rasmussen

Background

Autoimmune thyroid diseases are common and the prevalence of circulating thyroid antibodies (thyroid peroxidase antibody, TPO-Ab and thyroglobulin antibody, Tg-Ab) is high in the population. The knowledge of a possible association between lifestyle factors and circulating thyroid antibodies is limited.

Aim

To evaluate the correlation between smoking habits and the presence of circulating TPO-Ab and Tg-Ab.

Material and methods

In a cross-sectional comparative population study performed in two areas of Denmark with moderate and mild iodine deficiency, 4649 randomly selected subjects from the population in some predefined age groups between 18 and 65 years were examined. Blood tests were analysed for TPO-Ab and Tg-Ab using assays based on the RIA technique. The participants answered questionnaires, were clinically examined and blood and urine samples collected.

Results

Data were analysed in multivariate logistic regression models. There was a negative association between smoking and the presence of thyroid autoantibodies in serum. This association was observed for the presence of TPO-Ab and/or Tg-Ab, TPO-Ab (without respect to Tg-Ab status), Tg-Ab (without respect to TPO-Ab status) and both antibodies together. The association between smoking and thyroid autoantibodies was stronger for Tg-Ab than for TPO-Ab. There was no association between smoking and TPO-Ab measured alone or between smoking and TPO-Ab when Tg-Ab was included in the model as an explanatory variable.

Conclusion

Smoking was negatively associated with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies with the strongest association between smoking and Tg-Ab. The study design precludes any conclusions as to the cause of the negative association between smoking thyroid autoantibodies.

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Charlotte Cerqueira, Nils Knudsen, Lars Ovesen, Peter Laurberg, Hans Perrild, Lone B Rasmussen and Torben Jørgensen

Objective

Iodization of salt was introduced in Denmark in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency (ID). The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization rate of surgery and radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid disorders before and after the introduction of iodization, and to study a possible association between the changes and the raised iodine intake.

Design

A nationwide register study.

Methods

Information on operations and radioiodine treatments for benign thyroid disorders was extracted from nationwide registers in the years 1990 to 2007. Treatment rates are presented for surgery and for radioiodine separately, and as a combined rate, both nationwide and split by the regions of prior mild and moderate ID.

Results

A total of 65 605 treatments were identified: 26 456 operations and 39 149 radioiodine treatments. In the first years of iodization (1998–2000; rate ratio 2000/1997), the combined treatment rate increased with 2.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): −1.8–7.1). Split by prior ID level, the increase was seen in the region of moderate ID, but a decrease was seen in the region of mild ID. After 2000, the combined rate decreased, and ended up being 11.1% (95% CI: 7.1–15.0) lower in 2007 than before iodization (rate ratio 2007/1997). The changes were primarily due to changes in the use of radioiodine therapy as the surgery rates remained almost constant.

Conclusions

Iodization seemed to be associated with a temporary increase in the utilization rate of surgery and radioiodine therapy in the region of prior moderate ID, probably as a result of treatment of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism, but the rates ended up being lower than before iodization.

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Peter Laurberg, Torben Jørgensen, Hans Perrild, Lars Ovesen, Nils Knudsen, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Lone B Rasmussen, Allan Carlé and Pernille Vejbjerg

Objective: Denmark was an area of iodine deficiency, and mandatory iodine fortification of table salt and salt in bread (13 p.p.m. iodine) was initiated in 2000/2001. The Danish investigation on iodine intake and thyroid disease (DanThyr) is the monitoring of the iodine fortification program.

Design and methods: DanThyr consists of three main parts: a study of population cohorts initialized before (n = 4649) and after (n = 3570) iodization of salt, a prospective identification of incident cases of overt hyper- and hypothyroidism in a population of around 550 000 people since 1997, and compilation of data from the national registers on the use of thyroid medication, thyroid surgery, and radioiodine therapy. Studies were carried-out in parallel in subcohorts living in areas with differences in iodine content of ground water.

Results: The study showed profound effects of even small differences in iodine intake level on the prevalence of goiter, nodules, and thyroid dysfunction. Mild and moderate iodine deficiency was associated with a decrease in serum TSH with age. Other environmental factors were also important for goiter development (increase in risk, smoking and pregnancy; decrease in risk, oral contraception and alcohol consumption), and the individual risk depended on the genetic background. Environmental factors had only a minor influence on the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in the population. There were more cases of overt hypothyroidism in mild than in moderate iodine deficiency caused by a 53% higher incidence of spontaneous (presumably autoimmune) hypothyroidism. On the other hand, there were 49% more cases of overt hyperthyroidism in the area with moderate iodine deficiency. The cautious iodine fortification program, aiming at an average increase in iodine intake of 50 μg/day has been associated with a 50% increase in incidence of hyperthyroidism in the area with the most severe iodine deficiency. The incidence is expected to decrease in the future, but there may be more cases of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in young people.

Conclusion: A number of environmental factors influence the epidemiology of thyroid disorders, and even relatively small abnormalities and differences in the level of iodine intake of a population have profound effects on the occurrence of thyroid abnormalities. Monitoring and adjustment of iodine intake in the population is an important part of preventive medicine.

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Pernille Vejbjerg, Nils Knudsen, Hans Perrild, Peter Laurberg, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Lone B Rasmussen, Lars Ovesen and Torben Jørgensen

Objective: Patients with overt hypothyroidism show decreased echogenicity of the thyroid at ultrasonography (US). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between echogenicity of the thyroid/irregular echo pattern, and thyroid function in the general population, i.e. subjects without overt thyroid disease.

Design: A cross-sectional investigation of 4649 randomly selected adult subjects.

Methods: Blood samples were analysed for serum TSH, thyroid hormones and thyroid autoantibodies. US of the thyroid was performed.

Results: Participants with decreased echogenicity (n=379) had a higher mean TSH (1.65 mU/l) compared with subjects with normal echogenicity (1.21 mU/l, P<0.0001). The association was stronger in subjects with markedly decreased echogenicity (4.20 mU/l, P<0.0001). A similar association was seen when the subjects were divided into subgroups according to the level of TSH; more subjects with high levels of TSH had decreased echogenicity (P<0.0001). Likewise, more subjects with high levels of TSH had an irregular echo pattern (P<0.0001). Subjects with decreased echogenicity had a higher risk of having thyroid autoantibodies than subjects without decreased echogenicity (P<0.0001). This association was stronger when echogenicity was markedly decreased.

Conclusions: We demonstrated an association between hypoechogenicity at thyroid US and higher levels of serum TSH even in subjects without overt thyroid disease, suggesting decreased echogenicity as an early sign of thyroid dysfunction. Irregular echo pattern, whether accompanied by hypoechogenicity or not, was another possible marker of thyroid failure. This indicates a possible use of thyroid US in detecting early and subclinical thyroid dysfunction.

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Pernille Vejbjerg, Nils Knudsen, Hans Perrild, Peter Laurberg, Allan Carlé, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Lone B Rasmussen, Lars Ovesen and Torben Jørgensen

Objective

The iodine status of a population is traditionally evaluated by either urinary iodine (UI) excretion or by some measure of thyroid volume and the prevalence of goitre. In this prospective study of a mandatory iodization programme, we aimed to evaluate serum thyroglobulin (Tg) as a marker of iodine status in the population.

Methods

Two identical cross-sectional studies were performed before (1997–1998, n=4649) and after (2004–2005, n=3570) the initiation of the Danish iodization programme in two areas with mild and moderate iodine deficiency. Serum Tg was measured from blood samples. Thyroid volume was measured by ultrasonography.

Results

Before iodization, the median serum Tg was considerably higher in moderate than in mild iodine deficiency. Iodization led to a lower serum Tg in all examined age groups. The marked pre-iodization difference in Tg level between the regions was eliminated. The prevalence of Tg above the suggested reference limit (40 μg/l) decreased from 11.3 to 3.7% (P<0.0001). Using bootstrapping, we demonstrated a higher efficacy of Tg than of thyroid volume to show a difference between pre- and post-iodization values.

Conclusion

We found serum Tg to be a suitable marker of iodine nutrition status in the population. The results may suggest that the Danish iodization programme has led to a sufficient iodine intake, even if the median UI excretion is still marginally low according to WHO criteria.

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Allan Carlé, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Nils Knudsen, Hans Perrild, Lars Ovesen, Lone Banke Rasmussen, Torben Jørgensen and Peter Laurberg

Objective

Alcohol consumption is an important protective risk factor for many autoimmune diseases. We wished to study the association between alcohol consumption and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

Design

Population-based, case–control study, 1997–2001, Denmark.

Methods

Patients with newly diagnosed autoimmune overt hypothyroidism (n=140) were prospectively identified in a population (2 027 208 person-years of observation), and their matched controls with normal thyroid function (n=560) were recruited simultaneously from the same population. Participants gave information on alcohol intake, smoking, previous diseases, education, and family history of hypothyroidism. The association between alcohol intake and development of hypothyroidism was analyzed in conditional regression models.

Results

Hypothyroid cases had reported a lower alcohol consumption than controls (median units of alcohol (12 g) per week: 3 vs 5, P=0.002). In a multivariate regression model, alcohol consumption was associated with a reduction in risk for development of overt autoimmune hypothyroidism. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) compared with the reference group with a recent (last year) consumption of 1–10 units of alcohol per week were as follows: 0 units/week, 1.98 (1.21–3.33); 11–20 units/week, 0.41 (0.20–0.83); and ≥21 units/week, 0.90 (0.41–2.00). Similar results were found for maximum previous alcohol consumption during a calendar year. No interaction was found with type of alcohol consumed (wine vs beer), sex, or region of inhabitancy.

Conclusions

Alcohol consumption seems to confer considerable protection against development of overt autoimmune hypothyroidism irrespective of sex and type of alcohol consumed.

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Allan Carlé, Peter Laurberg, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Nils Knudsen, Hans Perrild, Lars Ovesen, Lone Banke Rasmussen and Torben Jorgensen

Objective: Studies of hypothyroidism are often based on referred patients, and limited information is available on the incidence rates of subtypes of hypothyroidism in the general population. We therefore studied incidences of subtypes of primary, overt hypothyroidism in a Danish population cohort and compared incidences in two subcohorts with different levels of iodine intake.

Design: A prospective population-based study, monitoring a well-defined cohort representative of the Danish population.

Methods: The Danish Investigation of Iodine Intake and Thyroid Diseases registry of hyper- and hypothyroidism was established as part of the monitoring of the iodine fortification of salt in Denmark. A computer-based system linked to laboratory databases identified all patients diagnosed with new, biochemically overt hypothyroidism in populations living in Aalborg (moderate iodine deficiency, n = 311 102) and Copenhagen (mild iodine deficiency, n = 227 632). We subsequently evaluated all identified patients to verify incident thyroid disease, and subclassified hypothyroidism into nosological types.

Results: During a 4-year period (2 027 208 person-years) 685 new cases of overt hypothyroidism were diagnosed in the cohort; the incidence rate was 32.8 per 100 000 person-years (standardised to the Danish population). Nosological types of hypothyroidism were: spontaneous (presumably autoimmune) 84.4%, post-partum 4.7%, amiodarone-associated 4.0%, subacute thyroiditis 1.8%, previous radiation or surgery 1.8%, congenital 1.6% and lithium-associated 1.6%. Crude incidence rates were 29.0 around Aalborg and 40.6 in an area of Copenhagen. The higher incidence rate of hypothyroidism in the area with higher iodine intake was caused solely by more cases of spontaneous (presumably autoimmune) hypothyroidism, whereas the incidence of non-spontaneous hypothyroidism (all types combined) was significantly lower in the area with higher iodine intake.

Conclusion: In a population-based study we observed a higher incidence of hypothyroidism with higher iodine intake. This was due solely to the entity of spontaneous hypothyroidism. The occurrence of overt hypothyroidism was relatively low in Denmark.