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Daniel Espes, Joey Lau and Per-Ola Carlsson

Insulin-producing cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have for long been a promising, but elusive treatment far from clinical translation into type 1 diabetes therapy. However, the field is now on the verge of moving such insulin-producing cells into clinical trials. Although stem cell therapies provide great opportunities, there are also potential risks such as teratoma formation associated with the treatment. Many considerations are needed on how to proceed with clinical translation, including whether to use hESCs or iPSCs, and whether encapsulation of tissue will be needed. This review aims to give an overview of the current knowledge of stem cell therapy outcomes in animal models of type 1 diabetes and a proposed road map towards the clinical setting with special focus on the potential risks and hurdles which needs to be considered. From a clinical point of view, transplantation of insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells must be performed without immune suppression in order to be an attractive treatment option. Although costly and highly labour intensive, patient-derived iPSCs would be the only solution, if not clinically successful encapsulation or tolerance induction protocols are introduced.

Free access

Josefin E Löfvenborg, Tomas Andersson, Per-Ola Carlsson, Mozhgan Dorkhan, Leif Groop, Mats Martinell, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Alicja Wolk and Sofia Carlsson

Objective

Sweetened beverage intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but its association with autoimmune diabetes is unclear. We aimed to investigate sweetened beverage intake and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA); autoimmune diabetes with features of type 2 diabetes.

Design/methods

Data from a Swedish population-based study was used, including incident cases of LADA (n = 357) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1136) and randomly selected controls (n = 1371). Diabetes classification was based on onset age (≥35), glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) and C-peptide. Sweetened beverage intake information was derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire. ORs adjusted for age, sex, family history of diabetes, education, lifestyle, diet, energy intake and BMI were estimated using logistic regression.

Results

Daily intake of >2 servings of sweetened beverages (consumed by 6% of participants) was associated with increased risk of LADA (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.11–3.56), and for each 200 mL daily serving, OR was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02–1.29). Findings were similar for sugar-sweetened (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00–1.39) and artificially sweetened beverages (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.95–1.32). Similarly, each daily serving increment in total sweetened beverage conferred 20% higher type 2 diabetes risk (95% CI: 1.07–1.34). In type 2 diabetes patients, high consumers displayed higher HOMA-IR levels (4.5 vs 3.5, P = 0.0002), but lower HOMA-B levels (55 vs 70, P = 0.0378) than non-consumers. Similar tendencies were seen in LADA.

Conclusions

High intake of sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of LADA. The observed relationship resembled that with type 2 diabetes, suggesting common pathways possibly involving insulin resistance.

Open access

Bahareh Rasouli, Tomas Andersson, Per-Ola Carlsson, Mozhgan Dorkhan, Valdemar Grill, Leif Groop, Mats Martinell, Tiinamaja Tuomi and Sofia Carlsson

Objective

Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate whether alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), an autoimmune form of diabetes with features of type 2 diabetes.

Design

A population-based case–control study was carried out to investigate the association of alcohol consumption and the risk of LADA.

Methods

We used data from the ESTRID case–control study carried out between 2010 and 2013, including 250 incident cases of LADA (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) positive) and 764 cases of type 2 diabetes (GADA negative), and 1012 randomly selected controls aged ≥35. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of diabetes in relation to alcohol intake, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, family history of diabetes, smoking, and education.

Results

Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.92–0.99 for every 5-g increment in daily intake). Similar results were observed for LADA, but stratification by median GADA levels revealed that the results only pertained to LADA with low GADA levels (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.76–0.94/5 g alcohol per day), whereas no association was observed with LADA having high GADA levels (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.94–1.06/5 g per day). Every 5-g increment of daily alcohol intake was associated with a 10% increase in GADA levels (P=0.0312), and a 10% reduction in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P=0.0418).

Conclusions

Our findings indicate that alcohol intake may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and type 2-like LADA, but has no beneficial effects on diabetes-related autoimmunity.