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  • Author: Olimpia Arellano Campos x
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Free access

Daniel Cuevas-Ramos, Paloma Almeda-Valdes, Francisco J Gómez-Pérez, Clara Elena Meza-Arana, Ivette Cruz-Bautista, Olimpia Arellano-Campos, Mariana Navarrete-López and Carlos A Aguilar-Salinas

Objective

Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) levels have been linked with beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in animals. It is elevated in humans with the metabolic syndrome. This study investigates independent factors associated with serum FGF21 levels.

Design

Cross-sectional study done in healthy blue-collar workers.

Methods

A medical history was taken, and FGF21 (measured using an ELISA commercial kit), glucose, uric acid, plasma lipids, total/high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, and retinal-binding protein 4 (RBP4) were measured in 210 individuals with (n=81) and without (n=129) metabolic syndrome.

Results

The median of serum FGF21 levels were higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome (339.5 vs 276.4 ng/l, P=0.01). Serum FGF21 levels correlated positively with body mass index (BMI; r=0.23, P=0.001) and age (r=0.17, P=0.01). After adjusting for age and BMI, a significant positive correlation persisted for fasting glucose, uric acid, and physical activity in both males (r=0.21, r=0.11, and r=0.19, all P<0.05) and females (r=0.20, r=0.19, and r=0.14, all P<0.05). In addition, FGF21 also correlates negatively with RBP4 (r=−0.27, P=0.02), total (r=−0.26, P=0.03), and HMW adiponectin (r=−0.30, P=0.01) in women. A multiple linear regression model analysis identified that BMI (standardized β (SB)=0.247; P=0.008), glucose (SB=0.226; P=0.003), uric acid (SB=0.191; P=0.04), and physical activity (SB=0.223; P=0.004) are independent factors influencing serum FGF21 levels (F=10.05, r 2=0.19, P<0.001). In addition, fasting hyperglycemia ≥100 mg/dl, excess body weight with BMI ≥25 kg/m2, and uric acid ≥5.5 mg/dl predicted higher serum FGF21 levels.

Conclusion

Serum FGF21 levels are influenced by BMI, fasting glycemia, uric acid, and physical activity.

Free access

Jose de Jesus Garduño-Garcia, Ulices Alvirde-Garcia, Guadalupe López-Carrasco, Ma Elena Padilla Mendoza, Roopa Mehta, Olimpia Arellano-Campos, Ricardo Choza, Leobardo Sauque, Maria Eugenia Garay-Sevilla, Juan Manuel Malacara, Francisco J Gomez-Perez and Carlos A Aguilar-Salinas

Objective

To examine the association between thyroid function and the components of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in an Hispanic population.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Methods

Subjects with no history of thyroid disease or diabetes were included. Thyroid function was stratified as euthyroid or subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) status and subsequently by free thyroxine (FT4) and TSH tertiles. The association of the metabolic syndrome components (defined by 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III criteria) and insulin resistance with thyroid status, TSH, and FT4 were examined.

Results

A total of 3148 subjects were analyzed. The prevalence of SCH was 8.3%. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was similar in euthyroid and SCH patients (31.6 vs 32.06%, P=0.89). Total cholesterol was higher in patients with SCH (5.51±1.19 vs 5.34±1.05 mmol/l, P<0.032). Serum TSH values showed a positive correlation (adjusted for age and sex) with total cholesterol, triglycerides, and waist circumference. In contrast, FT4 showed a positive correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and an inverse correlation with waist circumference, insulin, and HOMA-IR.

Conclusion

SCH is not associated with an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome (as conceived as a diagnostic category defined by the National Cholesterol, Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III criteria). Despite this, low thyroid function (even in the euthyroid state) predisposes to higher cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels. The combined use of TSH and FT4, compared with the assessment based on only FT4, is a more convenient approach to evaluate the association between thyroid function and metabolic variables.

Free access

Omar Yaxmehen Bello-Chavolla, Paloma Almeda-Valdes, Donaji Gomez-Velasco, Tannia Viveros-Ruiz, Ivette Cruz-Bautista, Alonso Romo-Romo, Daniel Sánchez-Lázaro, Dushan Meza-Oviedo, Arsenio Vargas-Vázquez, Olimpia Arellano Campos, Magdalena del Rocío Sevilla-González, Alexandro J Martagón, Liliana Muñoz Hernández, Roopa Mehta, César Rodolfo Caballeros-Barragán and Carlos A Aguilar-Salinas

Objective

We developed a novel non-insulin-based fasting score to evaluate insulin sensitivity validated against the euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC). We also evaluated its correlation with ectopic fact accumulation and its capacity to predict incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D).

Design and methods

The discovery sample was composed by 125 subjects (57 without and 68 with T2D) that underwent an EHC. We defined METS-IR as Ln((2*G0)+TG0)*BMI)/(Ln(HDL-c)) (G0: fasting glucose, TG0: fasting triglycerides, BMI: body mass index, HDL-c: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and compared its diagnostic performance against the M-value adjusted by fat-free mass (MFFM) obtained by an EHC. METS-IR was validated in a sample with EHC data, a sample with modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) data and a large cohort against HOMA-IR. We evaluated the correlation of the score with intrahepatic and intrapancreatic fat measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Subsequently, we evaluated its ability to predict incident T2D cases in a prospective validation cohort of 6144 subjects.

Results

METS-IR demonstrated the better correlation with the MFFM (ρ = −0.622, P < 0.001) and diagnostic performance to detect impaired insulin sensitivity compared to both EHC (AUC: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.78–0.90) and the SI index obtained from the FSIVGTT (AUC: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.53–0.81). METS-IR significantly correlated with intravisceral, intrahepatic and intrapancreatic fat and fasting insulin levels (P < 0.001). After a two-year follow-up, subjects with METS-IR in the highest quartile (>50.39) had the highest adjusted risk to develop T2D (HR: 3.91, 95% CI: 2.25–6.81). Furthermore, subjects with incident T2D had higher baseline METS-IR compared to healthy controls (50.2 ± 10.2 vs 44.7 ± 9.2, P < 0.001).

Conclusion

METS-IR is a novel score to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in healthy and at-risk subjects and a promising tool for screening of insulin sensitivity.

Restricted access

Paloma Almeda-Valdes, Donaji V Gómez Velasco, Olimpia Arellano Campos, Omar Yaxmehen Bello-Chavolla, Magdalena del Rocío Sevilla-González, Tannia Viveros Ruiz, Alexandro J Martagón Rosado, Claudia J Bautista, Liliana Muñoz Hernandez, Ivette Cruz-Bautista, Hortensia Moreno-Macias, Alicia Huerta-Chagoya, Karen Guadalupe Rodríguez-Álvarez, Geoffrey A Walford, Suzanne B R Jacobs, Luz E Guillen Pineda, Ma Luisa Ordoñez-Sánchez, Ernesto Roldan-Valadez, Joaquín Azpiroz, Jannette Furuzawa-Carballeda, Patricia Clark, Miguel F Herrera-Hernández, Elena Zambrano, Jose C Florez, María Teresa Tusié Luna and Carlos A Aguilar-Salinas

Objective

A haplotype at chromosome 17p13 that reduces expression and function of the solute carrier transporter SLC16A11 is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes in Mexicans. We aim to investigate the detailed metabolic profile of SLC16A11 risk haplotype carriers to identify potential physiological mechanisms explaining the increased type 2 diabetes risk.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Methods

We evaluated carriers (n = 72) and non-carriers (n = 75) of the SLC16A11 risk haplotype, with or without type 2 diabetes. An independent sample of 1069 subjects was used to replicate biochemical findings. The evaluation included euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), MRI and spectroscopy and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies.

Results

Fat-free mass (FFM)-adjusted M value was lower in carriers of the SLC16A11 risk haplotype after adjusting for age and type 2 diabetes status (β = −0.164, P= 0.04). Subjects with type 2 diabetes and the risk haplotype demonstrated an increase of 8.76 U/L in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (P= 0.02) and of 7.34 U/L in gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) (P= 0.05) compared with non-carriers and after adjusting for gender, age and ancestry. Among women with the risk haplotype and normal BMI, the adipocyte size was higher (P< 0.001).

Conclusions

Individuals carrying the SLC16A11 risk haplotype exhibited decreased insulin action. Higher serum ALT and GGT levels were found in carriers with type 2 diabetes, and larger adipocytes in subcutaneous fat in the size distribution in carrier women with normal weight.