Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author: Michel Pugeat x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Marja Ojaniemi and Michel Pugeat

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common clinical condition that manifests during adolescence with menstrual irregularities, acne, and hirsutism. As these symptoms are frequently observed in healthy teenagers, it can be difficult to recognize PCOS. Establishment of hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, and identifying a metabolic disorder are required for the management of PCOS in a teenager. The underlying defects in PCOS are still unclear; however, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome are common in both obese and non-obese PCOS patients, so that the evaluation of glucose tolerance is recommended. More than 50% of PCOS patients are overweight or obese, and will benefit from an increase in physical activity and weight loss. Metformin is a treatment option that requires further investigation before being recommended on a long-term basis.

Full access

Michel Pugeat, Ingrid Plotton, Aude Brac de la Perrière, Gérald Raverot, Henri Déchaud and Véronique Raverot

Measuring total testosterone level is the first-line approach in assessing androgen excess in women. The main pitfalls in measuring testosterone relate to its low concentration and to the structural similarity between circulating androgens and testosterone, requiring accurate techniques with high specificity and sensitivity. These goals can be achieved by immunoassay using a specific anti-testosterone monoclonal antibody, ideally after an extraction step. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) will be commonly used for measuring testosterone, providing optimal accuracy with a low limit of detection. Yet, the pitfalls of these two techniques are well identified and must be recognized and systematically addressed. In general, laboratories using direct testosterone immunoassay and mass spectrometry need to operate within a quality framework and be actively engaged in external quality control processes and standardization, so as to ensure appropriate interpretation irrespective of the particular laboratory. Circulating testosterone is strongly bound to sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and SHBG levels are typically low in overweight hyperandrogenic patients. Thus, low SHBG may decrease circulating testosterone to normal values, which will mask androgen excess status. One way to avoid this pitfall, awaiting direct free testosterone assays that are yet to be developed, is to measure SHBG and calculate free testosterone. A few other pitfalls will be discussed in this review, including those of adrenal androgen exploration, with the aim of helping clinicians to better handle laboratory investigation of androgen excess disorders in women.

Full access

Gérald Raverot, Anne Wierinckx, Emmanuel Jouanneau, Carole Auger, Françoise Borson-Chazot, Joël Lachuer, Michel Pugeat and Jacqueline Trouillas

Objective

Silent corticotroph adenomas (SCAs) are rare pituitary tumours immunoreactive for ACTH, but without clinical evidence of Cushing's disease. We characterized SCAs based on clinical, hormonal and molecular data, and compared the characteristics of these tumours with those of macro (MCA)- and micro (mCA)-ACTH adenomas with Cushing's disease.

Methods

Fifty ACTH adenomas (14 SCAs, 15 MCAs and 21 mCAs) with complete corresponding clinical, radiological and biochemical data were selected. Histological corticotroph differentiation; immunostaining for ACTH, β-endorphin and β-LPH; and mRNA expression levels of TPIT, POMC, GR α, prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) and galectin-3 were compared in 21 representative tumours.

Results

Despite the absence of clinical hypercortisolism in patients with SCA, elevated plasma ACTH levels that were similar to those associated with mCA were observed. The cortisol/ACTH ratio was similar between SCA and MCA groups and lower than that found with mCA (P<0.05). This dissociation could be explained by lower expression of PC1/3 in SCA and MCA than in mCA (P<0.05). After an i.v. dexamethasone suppression test, ACTH levels were significantly higher in patients with MCA than in those with mCA (P<0.05). Cytological and immunocytochemical analyses as well as mRNA expression levels of TPIT, POMC and GR α confirmed corticotroph differentiation in both mCAs and MCAs and in half of the SCAs, with a strong correlation between TPIT and POMC mRNA expression levels in SCAs (R 2=0.72; P<0.01) and in MCAs (R 2=0.65; P<0.05).

Conclusions

Despite the absence of hypercortisolism, SCAs exhibit histological, biochemical and molecular corticotroph differentiation. SCA and MCA show hormonal and molecular similarities differentiating them from mCA.

Full access

Florence Roucher-Boulez, Aude Brac de la Perriere, Aude Jacquez, Delphine Chau, Laurence Guignat, Christophe Vial, Yves Morel, Marc Nicolino, Gerald Raverot and Michel Pugeat

Objective

Triple-A or Allgrove syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the AAAS gene, which encodes a nucleoporin named ALADIN. It is characterized by a classical clinical triad: alacrima, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency, the canonic symptoms that are associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy. Only a few cohorts have been reported. The objective of the present study was to characterize the various spectra of adrenal function in Triple-A patients.

Methods

A retrospective clinical and biological monitoring of 14 patients (10 families) was done in a single multidisciplinary French center. All had AAAS gene sequenced and adrenal function evaluation.

Results

Nine different AAAS mutations were found, including one new mutation: c.755G>C, p.(Trp252Ser). Regarding adrenal function, defects of the zona fasciculata and reticularis were demonstrated by increased basal ACTH levels and low DHEAS levels in all cases regardless of the degree of glucocorticoid deficiency. In contrast, mineralocorticoid function was always conserved: i.e., normal plasma renin level associated with normal aldosterone level. The main prognostic feature was exacerbation of neuropathy and cognitive disorders.

Conclusions

These data suggest that, in Triple-A patients, adrenal function can be deficient, insufficient or compensated. In our cohort after the first decade of life, there does not appear to be any degradation of adrenal function over time. However, patients with compensated adrenal function should be informed and educated to manage a glucocorticoid replacement therapy in case of stressful conditions, with no need for systematic long-term treatment.

Full access

Gerard Conway, Didier Dewailly, Evanthia Diamanti-Kandarakis, Héctor F Escobar-Morreale, Stephen Franks, Alessandra Gambineri, Fahrettin Kelestimur, Djuro Macut, Dragan Micic, Renato Pasquali, Marija Pfeifer, Duarte Pignatelli, Michel Pugeat and Bulent O Yildiz

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common ovarian disorder associated with androgen excess in women, which justifies the growing interest of endocrinologists. Great efforts have been made in the last 2 decades to define the syndrome. The presence of three different definitions for the diagnosis of PCOS reflects the phenotypic heterogeneity of the syndrome. Major criteria are required for the diagnosis, which in turn identifies different phenotypes according to the combination of different criteria. In addition, the relevant impact of metabolic issues, specifically insulin resistance and obesity, on the pathogenesis of PCOS, and the susceptibility to develop earlier than expected glucose intolerance states, including type 2 diabetes, has supported the notion that these aspects should be considered when defining the PCOS phenotype and planning potential therapeutic strategies in an affected subject. This paper offers a critical endocrine and European perspective on the debate on the definition of PCOS and summarises all major aspects related to aetiological factors, including early life events, potentially involved in the development of the disorder. Diagnostic tools of PCOS are also discussed, with emphasis on the laboratory evaluation of androgens and other potential biomarkers of ovarian and metabolic dysfunctions. We have also paid specific attention to the role of obesity, sleep disorders and neuropsychological aspects of PCOS and on the relevant pathogenetic aspects of cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, we have discussed how to target treatment choices based according to the phenotype and individual patient's needs. Finally, we have suggested potential areas of translational and clinical research for the future with specific emphasis on hormonal and metabolic aspects of PCOS.

Full access

Gerard Conway, Didier Dewailly, Evanthia Diamanti-Kandarakis, Hector F Escobar-Morreale, Steven Franks, Alessandra Gambineri, Fahrettin Kelestimur, Djuro Macut, Dragan Micic, Renato Pasquali, Marija Pfeifer, Duarte Pignatelli, Michel Pugeat and Bulent O Yildiz

Background

There is evidence for differences between endocrinologists and other specialists in their approach to diagnosis and management of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Objective

A mailed survey consisting of a simple questionnaire aiming to understand current practice for diagnosis and management of the PCOS by specialists across Europe.

Methods

The questionnaire consisted of 23 questions grouped to achieve information on i) the general characteristics of the respondents, ii) patients with PCOS seen by endocrinologists, iii) the main diagnostic criteria, iv) biochemical parameters used in the differential diagnosis of hyperandrogenism, v) long-term concerns, and, finally vi) treatment choices. A total of 357 questionnaires representing 13.3% of the members of European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) were available for final analysis; 93% of the respondents were endocrinologists

Results

In relation to the diagnostic criteria, respondents were most likely to select menstrual irregularity as the most frequent criteria used for the diagnosis of PCOS although very high rates were achieved for the use of hirsutism and biochemical hyperandrogenism. It therefore appears that the NIH criteria were followed by the majority of respondents. The most frequent biochemical parameters in the differential diagnosis of hyperandrogenism were total testosterone or free androgen index. Obesity and type 2 diabetes were regarded as the principal long-term concerns for PCOS. The most common treatments for patients with PCOS were metformin (33%), lifestyle modification (25%), and oral contraceptives (22%). More direct treatments of infertility include clomiphene citrate alone or in combination with metformin, prescribed by 9 and 23%, respectively, whereas only 6% used other methods for induction of ovulation.

Conclusion

The survey produced by ESE is a good start for evaluating the perspective in the diagnosis and treatment of PCOS by endocrinologists in Europe.