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Florence Roucher-Boulez, Aude Brac de la Perriere, Aude Jacquez, Delphine Chau, Laurence Guignat, Christophe Vial, Yves Morel, Marc Nicolino, Gerald Raverot, and Michel Pugeat

Objective

Triple-A or Allgrove syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the AAAS gene, which encodes a nucleoporin named ALADIN. It is characterized by a classical clinical triad: alacrima, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency, the canonic symptoms that are associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy. Only a few cohorts have been reported. The objective of the present study was to characterize the various spectra of adrenal function in Triple-A patients.

Methods

A retrospective clinical and biological monitoring of 14 patients (10 families) was done in a single multidisciplinary French center. All had AAAS gene sequenced and adrenal function evaluation.

Results

Nine different AAAS mutations were found, including one new mutation: c.755G>C, p.(Trp252Ser). Regarding adrenal function, defects of the zona fasciculata and reticularis were demonstrated by increased basal ACTH levels and low DHEAS levels in all cases regardless of the degree of glucocorticoid deficiency. In contrast, mineralocorticoid function was always conserved: i.e., normal plasma renin level associated with normal aldosterone level. The main prognostic feature was exacerbation of neuropathy and cognitive disorders.

Conclusions

These data suggest that, in Triple-A patients, adrenal function can be deficient, insufficient or compensated. In our cohort after the first decade of life, there does not appear to be any degradation of adrenal function over time. However, patients with compensated adrenal function should be informed and educated to manage a glucocorticoid replacement therapy in case of stressful conditions, with no need for systematic long-term treatment.

Free access

Catie Cessans, Virginie Ehlinger, Catherine Arnaud, Armelle Yart, Yline Capri, Pascal Barat, Benoit Cammas, Didier Lacombe, Régis Coutant, Albert David, Sabine Baron, Jacques Weill, Bruno Leheup, Marc Nicolino, Jean-Pierre Salles, Alain Verloes, Maithé Tauber, Hélène Cavé, and Thomas Edouard

Background

Growth patterns of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) were established before the involved genes were identified.

Objective

The goal of this study was to compare growth parameters according to genotype in patients with NS.

Subjects and methods

The study population included 420 patients (176 females and 244 males) harboring mutations in the PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS genes. NS-associated PTPN11 mutations (NS-PTPN11) and NS with multiple lentigines-associated PTPN11 mutations (NSML-PTPN11) were distinguished. Birth measures and height and body mass index (BMI) measures at 2, 5, 10 years, and adulthood were compared with the general population and between genotypes.

Results

Patients with NS were shorter at birth (mean birth length standard deviation score (SDS): –1.0 ± 1.4; P < 0.001) and throughout childhood than the healthy population, with height SDS being –2.1 ± 1.3 at 2 years, and –2.1 ± 1.2 at 5 and 10 years and adulthood (P < 0.001). At birth, patients with NS-PTPN11 were significantly shorter and thinner than patients with NSML-PTPN11, SOS1, or KRAS. Growth retardation was significantly less severe and less frequent at 2 years in patients with NSML-PTPN11 and SOS1 than in patients with NS-PTPN11 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002 respectively). Patients with NS had lower BMI at 10 years (P < 0.001). No difference between genotypes was demonstrated.

Conclusion

Determining the growth patterns of patients with NS according to genotype should better inform clinicians about the natural course of growth in NS so that they can optimize the follow-up and management of these patients.

Free access

Laurence Dumeige, Livie Chatelais, Claire Bouvattier, Marc De Kerdanet, Capucine Hyon, Blandine Esteva, Dinane Samara-Boustani, Delphine Zenaty, Marc Nicolino, Sabine Baron, Chantal Metz-Blond, Catherine Naud-Saudreau, Clémentine Dupuis, Juliane Léger, Jean-Pierre Siffroi, Bruno Donadille, Sophie Christin-Maitre, Jean-Claude Carel, Regis Coutant, and Laetitia Martinerie

Objective

Few studies of patients with a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have considered those with normal male phenotype. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of 45,X/46,XY boys born with normal or minor abnormalities of external genitalia, notably in terms of growth and pubertal development.

Methods

Retrospective longitudinal study of 40 patients followed between 1982 and 2017 in France.

Results

Twenty patients had a prenatal diagnosis, whereas 20 patients had a postnatal diagnosis, mainly for short stature. Most patients had stunted growth, with abnormal growth spurt during puberty and a mean adult height of 158 ± 7.6 cm, i.e. −2.3 DS with correction for target height. Seventy percent of patients presented Turner-like syndrome features including cardiac (6/23 patients investigated) and renal malformations (3/19 patients investigated). Twenty-two patients had minor abnormalities of external genitalia. One patient developed a testicular embryonic carcinoma, suggesting evidence of partial gonadal dysgenesis. Moreover, puberty occurred spontaneously in 93% of patients but 71% (n = 5) of those evaluated at the end of puberty presented signs of declined Sertoli cell function (low inhibin B levels and increased FSH levels).

Conclusion

This study emphasizes the need to identify and follow-up 45,X/46,XY patients born with normal male phenotype until adulthood, as they present similar prognosis than those born with severe genital anomalies. Currently, most patients are diagnosed in adulthood with azoospermia, consistent with our observations of decreased testicular function at the end of puberty. Early management of these patients may lead to fertility preservation strategies.

Restricted access

Maria Lytrivi, Valérie Senée, Paraskevi Salpea, Federica Fantuzzi, Anne Philippi, Baroj Abdulkarim, Toshiaki Sawatani, Sandra Marín-Cañas, Nathalie Pachera, Anne Degavre, Pratibha Singh, Céline Derbois, Doris Lechner, Laurence Ladrière, Mariana Igoillo-Esteve, Cristina Cosentino, Lorella Marselli, Jean-François Deleuze, Piero Marchetti, Décio L Eizirik, Marc Nicolino, Annabelle Chaussenot, Cécile Julier, and Miriam Cnop

Objective

DNAJC3, also known as P58IPK, is an Hsp40 family member that interacts with and inhibits PKR-like ER-localized eIF2α kinase (PERK). Dnajc3 deficiency in mice causes pancreatic β-cell loss and diabetes. Loss-of-function mutations in DNAJC3 cause early-onset diabetes and multisystemic neurodegeneration. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic cause of early-onset syndromic diabetes in two unrelated patients, and elucidate the mechanisms of β-cell failure in this syndrome.

Methods

Whole exome sequencing was performed and identified variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. DNAJC3 was silenced by RNAi in INS-1E cells, primary rat β-cells, human islets, and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived β-cells. β-cell function and apoptosis were assessed, and potential mediators of apoptosis examined.

Results

The two patients presented with juvenile-onset diabetes, short stature, hypothyroidism, neurodegeneration, facial dysmorphism, hypoacusis, microcephaly and skeletal bone deformities. They were heterozygous compound and homozygous for novel loss-of-function mutations in DNAJC3. DNAJC3 silencing did not impair insulin content or secretion. Instead, the knockdown induced rat and human β-cell apoptosis and further sensitized cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress, triggering mitochondrial apoptosis via the pro-apoptototic Bcl-2 proteins BIM and PUMA.

Conclusions

This report confirms previously described features and expands the clinical spectrum of syndromic DNAJC3 diabetes, one of the five monogenic forms of diabetes pertaining to the PERK pathway of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. DNAJC3 deficiency may lead to β-cell loss through BIM- and PUMA-dependent activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.