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Valérie Bernard, Bruno Donadille, Tiphaine Le Poulennec, Mariana Nedelcu, Laetitia Martinerie and Sophie Christin-Maitre

Turner syndrome (TS), affecting 1/2000 to 1/2500 live born girls, is a chromosomal aberration with a total or partial loss of one of the X chromosomes. The diagnosis can be established from the intra-uterine life to adulthood. TS is a chronic disease with particular morbidity and mortality. The loss to follow-up rate, during transition, between children and adult units, remains a crucial issue.

This review focusses on the adolescent and young adult patients with TS. The different goals of TS transition are presented as well as some of the tools available in order to improve this transition. The involvement of the patient’s family, advocacy groups and therapeutic educational programs are discussed. A specificity concerning TS transition, as compared to other chronic diseases, relies on the fact that patients with TS may present a peculiar neurocognitive profile. They are in general more anxious than the general population. Therefore, psychological support should be offered to optimize transition.

Data illustrating the beneficial impact of an organised transition of TS, from paediatric units to multidisciplinary adult care systems, within the same reference centre are presented. Further studies are required to evaluate the mid to long term transition of paediatric patients referred to adult units.

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Juliane Léger, Damir Mohamed, Sophie Dos Santos, Myriam Ben Azoun, Delphine Zénaty, Dominique Simon, Anne Paulsen, Laetitia Martinerie, Didier Chevenne, Corinne Alberti, Jean-Claude Carel and Sophie Guilmin-Crepon

Context

Regular monitoring of serum IGF-I levels during growth hormone (GH) therapy has been recommended, for assessing treatment compliance and safety.

Objective

To investigate serum IGF-I SDS levels during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency, and to identify potential determinants of these levels.

Design, patients and methods

This observational cohort study included all patients (n = 308) with childhood-onset non-acquired or acquired GH deficiency (GHD) included in the database of a single academic pediatric care center over a period of 10 years for whom at least one serum IGF-I SDS determination during GH treatment was available. These determinations had to have been carried out centrally, with the same immunoradiometric assay. Serum IGF-I SDS levels were determined as a function of sex, age and pubertal stage, according to our published normative data.

Results

Over a median of 4.0 (2–5.8) years of GH treatment per patient, 995 serum IGF-I SDS determinations were recorded. In addition to BMI SDS, height SDS and GH dose (P < 0.01), etiological group (P < 0.01) had a significant effect on serum IGF-I SDS levels, with patients suffering from acquired GHD having higher serum IGF-I SDS levels than those with non-acquired GHD, whereas sex, age, pubertal stage, treatment duration, hormonal status (isolated GHD (IGHD) vs multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD)) and initial severity of GHD, had no effect.

Conclusions

These original findings have important clinical implications for long-term management and highlight the need for careful and appropriate monitoring of serum IGF-I SDS and GH dose, particularly in patients with acquired GHD, to prevent the unnecessary impact of potential comorbid conditions.

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Selmen Wannes, Monique Elmaleh-Bergès, Dominique Simon, Delphine Zénaty, Laetitia Martinerie, Caroline Storey, Georges Gelwane, Anne Paulsen, Emmanuel Ecosse, Nicolas De Roux, Jean Claude Carel and Juliane Léger

Objective

Non-idiopathic CPP is caused by acquired or congenital hypothalamic lesions visible on MRI or is associated with various complex genetic and/or syndromic disorders. This study investigated the different types and prevalence of non-isolated CPP phenotypes.

Design and Methods

This observational cohort study included all patients identified as having non-idiopathic CPP in the database of a single academic pediatric care center over a period of 11.5 years. Patients were classified on the basis of MRI findings for the CNS as having either hypothalamic lesions or complex syndromic phenotypes without structural lesions of the hypothalamus.

Results

In total, 63 consecutive children (42 girls and 21 boys) with non-isolated CPP were identified. Diverse diseases were detected, and the hypothalamic lesions visible on MRI (n = 28, 45% of cases) included hamartomas (n = 17; either isolated or with an associated syndromic phenotype), optic gliomas (n = 8; with or without neurofibromatosis type 1), malformations (n = 3) with interhypothalamic adhesions (n = 2; isolated or associated with syndromic CNS midline abnormalities, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, ectopic posterior pituitary) or arachnoid cysts (n = 1). The patients with non-structural hypothalamic lesions (n = 35, 55% of cases) had narcolepsy (n = 9), RASopathies (n = 4), encephalopathy or autism spectrum disorders with or without chromosomal abnormalities (n = 15) and other complex syndromic disorders (n = 7).

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that a large proportion (55%) of patients with non-isolated probable non-idiopathic CPP may have complex disorders without structural hypothalamic lesions on MRI. Future studies should explore the pathophysiological relevance of the mechanisms underlying CPP in these disorders.

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Laetitia Martinerie, Yves Morel, Claire-Lise Gay, Catherine Pienkowski, Marc de Kerdanet, Sylvie Cabrol, Claudine Lecointre, Regis Coutant, Sabine Baron, Michel Colle, Raja Brauner, Elisabeth Thibaud, Juliane Leger, Claire Nihoul-Fekete and Claire Bouvattier

Context

Gender assignment followed by surgery and hormonal therapy is a difficult decision in the management of 45,X/46,XY patients with abnormal external genitalia at birth considering the paucity of studies evaluating pubertal development and fertility outcome, most notably for patients raised as boys.

Objective

The purpose of this study was to describe the pubertal course of 20 45,X/46,XY patients born with ambiguous genitalia and raised as boys.

Methods

This is a multicenter retrospective study.

Results

Mean age at study was 25.6±2.4 years. Eighty-five percent of the patients presented a ‘classical’ mixed gonadal dysgenetic phenotype at birth. Puberty was initially spontaneous in all but three boys, although in six other patients, testosterone therapy was subsequently necessary for completion of puberty. Sixty-seven percent of the remaining patients presented signs of declined testicular function at the end of puberty (increased levels of FSH and low levels of testosterone and/or inhibin B). Moreover, an abnormal structure of the Y chromosome, known to alter fertility, was found in 10 out of 16 (63%) patients. Two patients developed testicular cancer. Half of the patients have adult penile length of <80 mm. Mean adult height is 156.9±2 cm, regardless of GH treatment.

Conclusions

In summary, 45,X/46,XY children born with ambiguous genitalia and raised as boys have an altered pubertal course and impaired fertility associated with adult short stature, which should, therefore, be taken into consideration for the management of these patients.

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Laurence Dumeige, Livie Chatelais, Claire Bouvattier, Marc De Kerdanet, Capucine Hyon, Blandine Esteva, Dinane Samara-Boustani, Delphine Zenaty, Marc Nicolino, Sabine Baron, Chantal Metz-Blond, Catherine Naud-Saudreau, Clémentine Dupuis, Juliane Léger, Jean-Pierre Siffroi, Bruno Donadille, Sophie Christin-Maitre, Jean-Claude Carel, Regis Coutant and Laetitia Martinerie

Objective

Few studies of patients with a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have considered those with normal male phenotype. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of 45,X/46,XY boys born with normal or minor abnormalities of external genitalia, notably in terms of growth and pubertal development.

Methods

Retrospective longitudinal study of 40 patients followed between 1982 and 2017 in France.

Results

Twenty patients had a prenatal diagnosis, whereas 20 patients had a postnatal diagnosis, mainly for short stature. Most patients had stunted growth, with abnormal growth spurt during puberty and a mean adult height of 158 ± 7.6 cm, i.e. −2.3 DS with correction for target height. Seventy percent of patients presented Turner-like syndrome features including cardiac (6/23 patients investigated) and renal malformations (3/19 patients investigated). Twenty-two patients had minor abnormalities of external genitalia. One patient developed a testicular embryonic carcinoma, suggesting evidence of partial gonadal dysgenesis. Moreover, puberty occurred spontaneously in 93% of patients but 71% (n = 5) of those evaluated at the end of puberty presented signs of declined Sertoli cell function (low inhibin B levels and increased FSH levels).

Conclusion

This study emphasizes the need to identify and follow-up 45,X/46,XY patients born with normal male phenotype until adulthood, as they present similar prognosis than those born with severe genital anomalies. Currently, most patients are diagnosed in adulthood with azoospermia, consistent with our observations of decreased testicular function at the end of puberty. Early management of these patients may lead to fertility preservation strategies.