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  • Author: L. Iughetti x
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S. BERNASCONI, F. PETRAGLIA, L. IUGHETTI, F. FACCHINETTI, C. MARCELLINI, G. GIOVANNELLI and A.R. GENAZZANI

Abstract

To further evaluate the role exerted by endogenous opioids on LH secretion a naloxone challenge (0.08 mg/Kg b.w. i.v.) was performed in 23 healthy children at different stages of puberty, in 5 adolescents in different period of menstrual cycle, in 3 case of idiopathic precocious puberty (PP), in 7 cases of delayed puberty (DP), in 4 females affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and in 6 patients affected by polycystic ovary disease (PCOD). Naloxone does not induce any significant change on LH plasma levels in prepubertal helathy children and in all the cases of PP and DP. Similarly there was no LH response in healthy adolescents neither in HH nor in PCOD, the response to naloxone appears only in preovulary and luteal phases. These data indicate that the central opioid system regulating LH secretion in humans is active only at more advanced stages of puberty and it does not seem to play a role in the beginning of sexual maturation. Moreover gonadal steroids seem to play a fundamental modulatory role on opioid-controlled LH secretion.

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S. Bernasconi, F. Petraglia, L. Iughetti, C. Marcellini, A. Lamborghini, F. Facchinetti and A. R. Genazzani

Abstract. In order to evaluate the secretion of betaendorphin in obese children and adolescents, we measured plasma beta-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol levels before and following administration of CRH (1 μg/kg). Fourteen normal weight and 22 obese subjects (weight excess ranging from 30 to 98%) were studied. Plasma hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay directly in plasma (cortisol, ACTH) and after silicic acid extraction and Sephadex G-75 column chromatography (beta-endorphin). Basal beta-endorphin levels in obese children were significantly higher than in controls (14.7 ± 1.8 vs 6.0 ± 0.6 pmol/l; mean ± sem). No differences were found in basal ACTH and cortisol levels. CRH administration significantly increased beta-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol levels in normal subjects and ACTH and cortisol levels in obese subjects. Plasma beta-endorphin levels in obese children and adolescents did not show any significant increment. These data confirm the higher than normal beta-endorphin plasma levels in obese subjects in childhood and demonstrate that CRH is unable to increase beta-endorphin levels, suggesting an impairment of the hypothalamo-pituitary control mechanisms or an extra-anterior pituitary source.