Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: L Ferrante x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

C L Ronchi, C Giavoli, E Ferrante, E Verrua, S Bergamaschi, D I Ferrari, S Corbetta, L Montefusco, M Arosio, B Ambrosi, A Spada and P Beck-Peccoz

Objective

Radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenomas, including GH-secreting ones, frequently leads to GH deficiency (GHD). Data on the effects of surgery alone (S) on dynamic GH secretion are limited. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of GHD in acromegalic patients treated with different therapeutic options.

Design and methods

Fifty-six patients in remission from acromegaly, (33 F & 23 M, age: 54±13 years, body mass index (BMI): 28.4±4.1 kg/m2, 21 with adequately substituted pituitary deficiencies) treated by S alone (n=33, group 1) or followed by RT (n=23, group 2), were investigated for GHD by GHRH plus arginine testing, using BMI-adjusted cut-offs. Several metabolic and cardiovascular parameters (waist circumference, body fat percentage, blood pressure, fasting and post-oral glucose tolerance test glucose, HbA1c, insulin resistance and lipid profile) were evaluated in all the patients and 28 control subjects with known diagnosis of GHD.

Results

Serum GH peak after challenge was 8.0±9.7 μg/l, without any correlation with post-glucose GH nadir and IGF-1 levels. The GH response indicated severe GHD in 34 patients (61%) and partial GHD in 15 patients (27%). IGF-1 were below the normal range in 14 patients (25%). The frequency of GHD was similar in the two treatment groups (54% in group 1 and 70% in group 2). No significant differences in metabolic parameters were observed between acromegalic patients and controls with GHD.

Conclusions

Severe GHD may occur in about 60% of patients treated for acromegaly, even when cured after S alone. Thus, a stimulation test (i.e. GHRH plus arginine) is recommended in all cured acromegalic patients, independently from previous treatment.

Free access

Cristina L Ronchi, Elisa Verrua, Emanuele Ferrante, Gwendolyn Bender, Elisa Sala, Andrea G Lania, Martin Fassnacht, Paolo Beck-Peccoz, Bruno Allolio, Anna Spada and Maura Arosio

Objective

Radiation therapy (RT) is a useful adjuvant tool for acromegalic patients not cured by surgery and/or not responding to pharmacotherapy. However, its specific effects on cardio- and cerebrovascular morbidity are still on debate.

Design

Retrospective analysis of 42 acromegalic patients cured after conventional radiotherapy (CRT, n=31) or radiosurgery by gamma-knife (GKRS, n=11) followed for a median period of 16.5 years (range: 2–40). Totally, 56 patients cured by surgery alone, with similar GH/IGF1 levels and duration of disease remission, served as control group.

Methods

Changes in cardiovascular risk factors, such as body mass index, glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and lipid profile (pre-defined primary end point) and occurrence of new major cardio- and cerebrovascular events (secondary end point) during follow-up.

Results

The number of obese, hypertensive, and dyslipidemic subjects increased over time only in patients cured with RT. In contrast, the glucose response to the oral glucose tolerance test and the percentage of subjects with glucose alterations improved only in controls. As expected, the percentage of patients with pituitary failure was deeply higher among RT patients than among controls (86 vs 30%, P<0.0005). Despite these findings, a similar number of RT patients and controls developed major cardio- or cerebrovascular events (4/42 vs 3/56, P: NS). No differences were found between CRT and GKRS subgroups.

Conclusions

Previous RT seems to be associated with a worse metabolic profile in acromegalic patients studied after a long-term follow-up. Nevertheless, a direct link between RT and cardiovascular events remains to be proven.

Free access

Claudia Giavoli, Emanuele Ferrante, Eriselda Profka, Luca Olgiati, Silvia Bergamaschi, Cristina L Ronchi, Elisa Verrua, Marcello Filopanti, Elena Passeri, Laura Montefusco, Andrea G Lania, Sabrina Corbetta, Maura Arosio, Bruno Ambrosi, Anna Spada and Paolo Beck-Peccoz

Objective

A common polymorphic variant of GH receptor (exon 3 deletion, d3GHR) has been linked with increased response to recombinant human GH (rhGH) in some patients with or without GH deficiency (GHD). The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of the GHR genotype on the phenotype of GHD adults and on the metabolic effect of rhGH therapy.

Design

Prospective study of GHD patients evaluated before and during short- (1 year, n=100) and long-term (5 years, n=50) rhGH therapy.

Methods

Effects of rhGH on IGF1 levels, body composition (body fat percentage, BF%), body mass index, lipid profile, and glucose homeostasis (fasting insulin and glucose, insulin sensitivity indexes) were evaluated according to the presence or the absence of the d3GHR variant.

Results

The different genotype did not influence basal phenotype of GHD. Short-term rhGH determined normalization of IGF1 levels, decrease in BF%, and worsening of insulin sensitivity, independently from the presence of the d3GHR allele. A significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol occurred in the d3GHR group. Normalization of IGF1 levels and decrease in BF% were maintained after 5 years. Insulin sensitivity restored to basal values, though in d3GHR patients fasting glucose remained significantly higher than at baseline. After both 1 and 5 years, percentage of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance, similar in the two groups at baseline, decreased in fl/fl while doubled in d3GHR patients. In this last group, a long-term significant reduction in total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was also observed.

Conclusion

The functional difference of d3GHR may influence some metabolic effects of rhGH on GHD adults.

Free access

E Ferretti, ML Jaffrain Rea, C Asteria, D Di Stefano, V Esposito, L Ferrante, P Daniele, C Tiberti, M Gallucci, C Bosman, E Alesse, A Gulino, P Beck-Peccoz and G Tamburrano

OBJECTIVE: Pituitary adenomas are usually sporadic, although rare familial cases have been described. Here we report two first degree female cousins with giant pituitary adenoma and overweight. Both presented with secondary amenorrhoea, occasional headache and weight gain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In both patients clinical, morphological and genetic studies were performed. Both patients underwent surgery and post-operative medical therapy with somatostatin analogues and dopamine agonist, followed by a conventional radiotherapy course. RESULTS: Clinical examination at presentation revealed an acromegaloid habitus only in the second patient. Basal and dynamic hormonal evaluation showed high serum GH and serum IGF-I values, higher in the second than in the first patient, and a mild hyperprolactinaemia only in the first patient. On optical and electron microscopy, both tumours were oncocytic adenomas, immunopositive for GH in the first patient and GH/prolactin in the second. The genetic analysis for germ-line mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene was negative. Two years after radiotherapy a remarkable shrinkage of both tumours was observed, whereas the overweight worsened in both patients, accompanied by high plasma leptin values. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first report of familial pituitary adenomas including one case of a clinically silent GH-secreting adenoma. In addition, it provides further evidence that familial pituitary tumours can occur as a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 unrelated disease.