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Andreas Machens, Kerstin Lorenz, Carsten Sekulla, Wolfgang Höppner, Karin Frank-Raue, Friedhelm Raue and Henning Dralle

Objective

Twenty years ago, the groundbreaking discovery that rearranged during transfection (RET) mutations underlie multiple endocrine neoplasia 2 (MEN2) and familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC) ushered in the era of personalized medicine. MEN2-associated signs, taking time to manifest, can be subtle. This study sought to clarify to what extent conventional estimates of 1:200 000–500 000 underestimate the incidence of RET mutations in the population.

Design

Included in this retrospective investigation were 333 RET carriers born between 1951 and 2000 and operated on at the largest German surgical referral center (286 carriers) or elsewhere (47 carriers).

Methods

To estimate the incidence of RET mutations, the number of RET carriers born in Germany in five decades (1951–1960, 1961–1970, 1971–1980, 1981–1990, and 1991–2000) was divided by the corresponding number of German live births.

Results

Owing to improved diagnosis and capture of FMTC and MEN2 patients, minimum incidence estimates increased over time: overall from 5.0 (1951–1960) to 9.9 (1991–2000) per million live births and year (P=0.008), and by American Thyroid Association/ATA class from 1.7 to 3.7 for ATA class C (P=0.008); from 1.8 to 2.7 for ATA class A (P=0.017); from 1.5 to 2.2 for ATA class B (P=0.20); and from 0 to 1.4 for ATA class D mutations per million live births and year (P=0.008). Based on 1991–2000 incidence estimates the prevalence in Germany is ∼1:80 000 inhabitants.

Conclusions

The molecular minimum incidence estimate of ≈1:100 000 was two- to fivefold greater than conventional estimates of 1:200 000–500 000.

Free access

Karin Frank-Raue, Christine Haag, Egbert Schulze, Roger Keuser, Friedhelm Raue, Henning Dralle and Kerstin Lorenz

Objective

Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour (HPT-JT) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant cause of benign and malignant parathyroid tumours, ossifying jaw tumours, various cystic and neoplastic renal abnormalities and benign and malignant uterine tumours. Disease-causing mutations have been localised in the tumour suppressor gene CDC73. There is limited information available on the mutations, and resulting phenotypes and long-term follow-up data are especially scarce.

Design

We analysed the clinical data from 16 patients (including three families) carrying mutations in the CDC73 gene. We describe five new mutations/gene variants, the corresponding phenotypes of these carriers and the long-term follow-up.

Methods

The 16 patients were evaluated at an endocrine outpatient clinic and at a surgical department. DNA samples were obtained for sequence analysis of the CDC73 gene.

Results

Clinical features of HPT-JT syndrome were detected in 13 of the 15 carriers with germline CDC73 mutations. The major features were benign (n=7; 47%) or cancerous (n=3; 20%) HPT-JT was present in eight cases (53%). Most patients had severe hypercalcaemia, and median serum calcium levels were 3.36 mmol/l. A patient with non-secretory parathyroid carcinoma was included. HPT was diagnosed at a median age of 28.5 years. Mutational analysis of the CDC73 gene identified eight sequence changes, three of them have been reported previously, whereas five are novel: c.1346delG, c.88_94delTTCTCCT, the non-coding variants, c.307+5G>T and c.424−5T>C and c.*12C>A of unknown significance.

Conclusions

This study significantly increases the information available on the mutations and phenotypes of HPT-JT syndrome.