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  • Author: Katharina Schilbach x
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Katharina Schilbach, Christina Gar, Andreas Lechner, Shiva Sophia Nicolay, Laura Schwerdt, Michael Haenelt, Jakob Dal, Jens-Otto Lunde Jørgensen, Sylvère Störmann, Jochen Schopohl and Martin Bidlingmaier

Objective

Growth hormone (GH) nadir (GHnadir) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is an important tool in diagnosing acromegaly, but data evaluating the need to adjust cut-offs to biological variables utilizing today's assay methods are scarce. We therefore investigated large cohorts of healthy subjects of both sexes to define normal GHnadir concentrations for a modern, sensitive, 22 kD-GH-specific assay.

Design

Multicenter study with prospective and retrospective cohorts (525 healthy adults: 405 females and 120 males).

Methods

GH concentrations were measured by the IDS-iSYS immunoassay after oral application of 75 g glucose.

Results

GHnadir concentrations (µg/L) were significantly higher in lean and normal weight subjects (group A) compared to overweight and obese subjects (group B); (males (M): A vs B, mean: 0.124 vs 0.065, P = 0.0317; premenopausal females without estradiol-containing OC (OC-EE) (FPRE): A vs B, mean: 0.179 vs 0.092, P < 0.0001; postmenopausal women (FPOST): A vs B, mean: 0.173 vs 0.078, P < 0.0061). Age, glucose metabolism and menstrual cycle had no impact on GHnadir. However, premenopausal females on OC-EE (FPREOC) exhibited significantly higher GHnadir compared to all other groups (all P < 0.0001). BMI had no impact on GHnadir in FPREOC (A vs B, mean: 0.624 vs 0.274, P = 0.1228).

Conclusions

BMI, sex and OC-EE intake are the major determinants for the GHnadir during OGTT in healthy adults. Using a modern sensitive GH assay, GHnadir concentrations in healthy subjects are distinctly lower than cut-offs used in previous guidelines for diagnosis and monitoring of acromegaly.

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Cheol Ryong Ku, Thierry Brue, Katharina Schilbach, Stanislav Ignatenko, Sandor Magony, Yoon-Sok Chung, Byung-Joon Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Ho-Cheol Kang, Jung Hee Kim, Min Seon Kim, Aldona Kowalska, Marek Bolanowski, Marek Ruchala, Svetozar Damjanovic, Juraj Payer, Yun Jung Choi, Su Jin Heo, Tae Kyoung Kim, MinKyu Heo, Joan Lee and Eun Jig Lee

Objective

Hybrid Fc-fused rhGH (GX-H9) is a long-acting recombinant human growth hormone (GH) under clinical development for both adults and children with GH deficiency (GHD). We compared the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of weekly and every other week (EOW) dosages of GX-H9 with those of daily GH administration in adult GHD (AGHD) patients.

Design

This was a randomized, open-label, active-controlled and dose-escalation study conducted in 16 endocrinology centers in Europe and Korea.

Methods

Forty-five AGHD patients with or without prior GH treatment were enrolled. Patients with prior GH treatments were required to have received the last GH administration at least 1 month prior to randomization. Subjects were sequentially assigned to treatment groups. Fifteen subjects were enrolled to each treatment group and randomly assigned to receive either GX-H9 or Genotropin (4:1 ratio). GX-H9 dosage regimens for Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 0.1 mg/kg weekly, 0.3 mg/kg EOW and 0.2 mg/kg EOW, respectively. All Genotropin-assigned subjects received 6 µg/kg Genotropin, regardless of treatment group. Main outcome analyses included measurements of serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity.

Results

Mean GX-H9 peak and total exposure increased with an increase in dose after a single-dose administration. The mean IGF-I response was sustained above baseline over the intended dose interval of 168 h for the weekly and 336 h for the EOW GX-H9 groups. Safety profiles and immunogenicity were not different across the treatment groups and with Genotropin.

Conclusions

GX-H9 has the potential for up to twice-monthly administration.