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P Goudet, C Bonithon-Kopp, A Murat, P Ruszniewski, P Niccoli, F Ménégaux, G Chabrier, F Borson-Chazot, A Tabarin, P Bouchard, G Cadiot, A Beckers, I Guilhem, O Chabre, P Caron, H Du Boullay, B Verges, and C Cardot-Bauters

Context

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) disease is an autosomal dominant syndrome that is believed to equally affect men and women. This assumption has never been confirmed.

Objective

The aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of gender on the prevalence of MEN1 lesions, on their lifetime probability of occurrence, and on the diagnosis of MEN1.

Design

Data regarding a study of 734 cases of MEN1 from the multicenter ‘Groupe d'étude des Tumeurs Endocrines’ were analyzed.

Results

There were 57.8% females. The prevalence and probability of pancreatic tumors were higher in males than in females (P=0.06, P=0.0004). This difference was due to gastrinomas. The prevalence and probability of developing pituitary tumors were significantly greater in females (P<0.001, P<0.0001). Thymic tumors were exclusively found in men. There were no significant gender differences in the prevalence and the probability of developing hyperparathyroidism, or adrenal and bronchial tumors, or in the proportion of positive genetic tests. A family history of MEN1 was more frequently found in men than in women at the time of diagnosis (P=0.02). In the case of pituitary tumor, the proportion of patients diagnosed with MEN1 at the time of the first lesion was lower in women (44.2%) than in men (67.3%).

Conclusion

The phenotype expression of the MEN1 disease gene was different in males and females. In female patients, the possibility of MEN1 is not sufficiently taken into account. Any patient presenting a lesion that belongs to the MEN1 spectrum, such as a pituitary tumor, should be closely questioned about their family history and should be tested for hypercalcemia.

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A Rozenbaum, C Buffet, C Bigorgne, B Royer, A Rouxel, M Bienvenu, N Chereau, F Menegaux, L Leenhardt, and G Russ

Objective

Active surveillance of cytologically proven microcarcinomas has been shown as a safe procedure. However, fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is not recommended by European Thyroid Association (ETA) and American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines for highly suspicious nodules ≤ 10 mm. The aim of the study was to assess the outcomes of active surveillance of EU-TIRADS 5 nodules ≤ 10 mm not initially submitted to FNAB.

Patients and methods

80 patients with at least one EU-TIRADS 5 nodule ≤ 10 mm and no suspicious lymph nodes, accepting active surveillance, were included.

Results

Mean baseline diameter and volume were 5.4 mm (±2.0) and 64.4 mm3 (±33.5), respectively. After a median follow-up of 36.1 months, a volumetric increase ≥ 50% occurred in 28 patients (35.0%) and a suspicious lymph node in 3 patients (3.8%). Twenty-four patients underwent an FNAB (30.0%) after at least a 1 year follow-up of which 45.8% were malignant, 8.3% benign, 33.3% undetermined and 8.3% nondiagnostic. Sixteen patients (20.0%) underwent conversion surgery after a median follow-up of 57.2 months, confirming the diagnosis of papillary carcinoma in 15/16 cases (not described in 1 histology report), all in remission at 6–12 months postoperative follow-up.

Conclusion

Applying ETA and ATA guidelines to avoid FNA of EU-TIRADS 5 sub-centimeter nodules and proceeding to active surveillance of such nodules in selected patients is a safe procedure. Thus, US-FNAB could be postponed until the nodule shows signs of progression or a suspicious lymph node appears, with no added risk for the patient.

Free access

E Mirallié, F Borel, C Tresallet, A Hamy, M Mathonnet, J C Lifante, L Brunaud, F Menégaux, J B Hardouin, C Blanchard, and THYRQOL Group

Objective

This study is to determine the impact of complications after total thyroidectomy on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and to identify significant predictive factors of HR-QoL changes. HR-QoL is usually impaired in patients with thyroid diseases compared to the general population. Thyroidectomy is largely performed in the case of benign thyroid benign and can be associated with long-term complications (vocal cord palsy, hypoparathyroidism).

Design

The prospective ThyrQoL multicenter trial (NCT02167529) included 800 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for benign or malignant non-extensive disease in seven French referral hospitals between 2014 and 2016.

Methods

HR-QoL was assessed using the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) self-questionnaire with a 6-month follow-up.

Results

We observed a significant improvement of HR-QoL 6 months after surgery (P < 0.0001). Postoperative complications were associated with a non-significant impairment of HR-QoL. In multivariable analysis, Graves’ disease was associated with a significant improvement of HR-QoL (OR = 2.39 [1.49; 3.84]) and thyroid malignant disease with an impairment of HR-QoL (OR = 1.44 [0.99; 2.08]) after thyroidectomy.

Conclusion

We observed a significant improvement of HR-QoL 6 months after total thyroid surgery for benign thyroid disease.