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Hans-Peter Guler, Katharina Binz, Eugen Eigenmann, Silvia Jäggi, Daniel Zimmermann, Jürgen Zapf, and E. Rudolf Froesch

Abstract.

The short stature of mini-poodles is associated with low serum levels of IGF-I. Standard poodles are taller and have considerably higher serum levels of IGF-I. Low IGF-I serum levels may be a symptom or the cause of small stature. We, therefore, undertook a study in which serum IGF-I levels of mini-poodles were elevated over a prolonged period of time by a constant infusion of rhIGF-I and the growth rate of the mini-poodles was followed. We infused four mini-poodles from day 91 to day 221 of age with 6 mg/day of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I). Serum levels of IGF-I rose from about 160 to about 500 μg/l. Blood glucose remained within normal limits. Stimulation tests with clonidine and with GHRH revealed suppression of endogenous GH secretion during the IGF-I infusion. Serum levels of IGF-II and of creatinine were lower in the IGF-I-infused animals. Radial length and body weight did not increase to a greater extent in the IGF-I infused dogs than in controls. However, 'adapted body mass index' (aBMI = gram body weight/(mm radial length)2) decreased in each of the IGF-I infused animals, whereas it increased in each of the control dogs (p <0.05). We conclude that long-term infusion of IGF-I does not stimulate growth in young minipoodles, but may change body composition.

Free access

Christopher J Child, Daniel Conroy, Alan G Zimmermann, Whitney W Woodmansee, Eva Marie Erfurth, and Leslie L Robison

Objective

Speculation remains that GH treatment is associated with increased neoplasia risk. Studies in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors suggested higher rates of second neoplasms, while cancer risk data for GH-treated and untreated hypopituitary adults have been variable. We present primary cancer risk data from the Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study (HypoCCS) with a focus on specific cancers, and assessment of recurrence rates for pituitary adenomas (PA) and craniopharyngiomas (CP).

Design

Incident neoplasms during HypoCCS were evaluated in 8418 GH-treated vs 1268 untreated patients for primary malignancies, 3668 GH-treated vs 720 untreated patients with PA history, and 956 GH-treated vs 102 untreated patients with CP history.

Methods

Using population cancer rates, standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for all primary cancers, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Neoplasm rates in GH-treated vs untreated patients were analysed after propensity score adjustment of baseline treatment group imbalances.

Results

During mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 225 primary cancers were identified in GH-treated patients, with SIR of 0.82 (95% CI 0.71–0.93). SIRs (95% CI) for GH-treated patients were 0.59 (0.36–0.90) for breast, 0.80 (0.57–1.10) for prostate, and 0.62 (0.38–0.96) for colorectal cancers. Cancer risk was not statistically different between GH-treated and untreated patients (relative risk (RR)=1.00 (95% CI 0.70–1.41), P=0.98). Adjusted RR for recurrence was 0.91 (0.68–1.22), P=0.53 for PA and 1.32 (0.53–3.31), P=0.55 for CP.

Conclusions

There was no increased risk for all-site cancers: breast, prostate or colorectal primary cancers in GH-treated patients during HypoCCS. GH treatment did not increase the risk of PA and CP recurrences.

Open access

Christopher J Child, Alan G Zimmermann, Whitney W Woodmansee, Daniel M Green, Jian J Li, Heike Jung, Eva Marie Erfurth, and Leslie L Robison

Objective

GH and IGFs have mitogenic properties, causing speculation that GH treatment could increase risk of malignancy. While studies in GH-treated childhood cancer survivors have suggested a slight increase in second neoplasms, studies in GH-treated adults have been equivocal.

Design

Incidence of de novo and second cancers was evaluated in 6840 GH-treated and 940 non GH-treated adult patients in the Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study pharmacoepidemiological database.

Methods

Evident cancer cases were evaluated in the main analysis, with sensitivity analyses including probable and possible cancers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancers were calculated using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results for the USA and GLOBOCAN for all other countries.

Results

During the mean follow-up of 3.7 years/GH-treated patient, 142 evident cancer cases were identified, giving an overall SIR of 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74–1.04); 95% CIs included the value of 1.0 for each country examined. The SIR for GH-treated patients from the USA (71 cases) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.73–1.18), and for non GH-treated patients from the USA (27 cases) was 1.16 (95% CI 0.76–1.69). For GH-treated patients from the USA aged <35 years, the SIR (six cases) was 3.79 (1.39–8.26), with SIR not elevated for all other age categories; SIR for patients from the USA with childhood onset (CO) GH deficiency (GHD) was 2.74 (95% CI 1.18–5.41). The SIR for colorectal cancer in GH-treated patients (11 cases) was 0.60 (95% CI 0.30–1.08).

Conclusions

With relatively short follow-up, the overall primary cancer risk in 6840 patients receiving GH as adults was not increased. Elevated SIRs were found for subgroups in the USA cohort defined by age <35 years or CO GHD.