Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author: D von Muhlen x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

D. Emrich, M. Albani and A. von zur Mühlen

ABSTRACT

The five times concentrated gamma globulins of the plasma of 28 hyperthyroid patients were tested by the McKenzie bioassay. Evidence for the presence of LATS was obtained in 22 patients. In order to compare the numerical values of LATS obtained at different times they were corrected, using a laboratory standard, which was tested in each assay, and the mean regression coefficient of three dose response curves of the laboratory standard. The corrected LATS values were then compared with the percentage of 131I T3 in the patients' plasma 24 hours after a therapeutic dose of 131I. There was no difference in the 1311 T3 between the LATS-negative and the LATS-positive subjects, but in the LATS-positive subjects there was a significant positive correlation between the percentage of 1311 T3 and the LATS values (correlation coefficient 0.793; P < 0.001). No correlation could be found between LATS and the relative concentrations of the other labelled iodo-aminoacids in the plasma.

Restricted access

K.-D. Döhler, A. von zur Mühlen and U. Döhler

ABSTRACT

Pituitary content and concentration of LH, FSH and prolactin were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) at 2-day intervals from birth to puberty in female and male rats. During the first 2 to 3 weeks of life all hormones were low in pituitary content and concentration in both sexes. They all increased in females during the third and fourth week, but decreased sharply during the days before vaginal opening. During the first ovulatory cycle pituitary content and concentration of LH and prolactin increased again, FSH, however, remained low. In males, pituitary LH, FSH and prolactin content reached peak levels during puberty. Our results show a distinct sexual dimorphism for pituitary FSH. Pituitary LH and prolactin content and concentration patterns show similar tendencies in both sexes with a delay of several days in males. The dramatic changes in female pituitary hormone concentrations just before the first ovulation were not detected in males before the first occurrence of mature spermatozoa in the tubuli of the testes.

Restricted access

R. D. Hesch, M. Huefner, A. von zur Mühlen and D. Emrich

ABSTRACT

Serum triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations have been measured in 7 patients with euthyroid endocrine exophthalmos and in 8 patients with hyperthyroidism. These results have been assessed in relation to other tests of thyroid function.

The non-suppressibility of euthyroid endocrine exophthalmos is due to elevated endogenous T3 levels and correlated to a negative response of the pituitary gland to TRH.

In hyperthyroid patients who are euthyroid under antithyroid drug therapy, no general correlation of routine laboratory data with T3 levels, suppressibility and TRH response could be found. There is a gap between normal T3 and T4 levels and the restoration of the normal TRH response. A condition is described in which euthyroid patients show thyrotoxic behaviour of the pituitary receptors.

Restricted access

A. von zur Mühlen, D. Emrich, R. D. Hesch and J. Köbberling

ABSTRACT

Plasma concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured radioimmunologically in primary hypothyroid patients after administration of organic iodine (Endojodin®), iodoaminoacids, synthetic corticotrophin (ACTH) and cortisone. During intravenous injections of Endojodin® for 5 days there was a slight but significant decrease of plasma TSH. After oral application of 6 different l-iodoaminoacids in high doses over several days we observed in rough relation to their biologic activity a fall in TSH levels in plasma. D-thyroxine, however, was also active under these conditions. During infusions of synthetic ACTH (β1-24, β1-39) and cortisone in two different doses the TSH levels in primary hypothyroid patients decreased in the same way.

Synthetic thyrotrophin releasing factor (TRF) after intravenous application was followed by an abrupt rise in plasma TSH concentration in euthyroid and primary hypothyroid persons. In secondary hypothyroid and hyperthyroid patients no or only slight effects were observed in the TSH levels. The possible employment of TRF in the diagnosis of thyroidal or hypophyseal disorders is discussed.

Restricted access

G. BRABANT, A. BRABANT, TH. SCHUERMEYER, R. D. HESCH and A. VON ZUR MÜHLEN

Restricted access

H. Wiermann, H. A. Durrer, A. von zur Mühlen, C. Ruppert, R. A. Schmidt and D. Reinwein

Free access

J Svartberg, D von Muhlen, H Schirmer, E Barrett-Connor, J Sundfjord and R Jorde

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that lower endogenous testosterone levels are associated with higher blood pressure, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular hypertrophy. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: Sex hormone levels, measured by immunoassay, anthropometric measurements and resting blood pressure were studied in 1548 men aged 25-84 Years; echocardiography was completed in 1264 of these men. Partial correlations and multiple regressions were used to estimate the associations between sex hormones, blood pressure and left ventricular mass by height. Analyses of variance and covariance were used to compare men with categorical hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. RESULTS: In age-adjusted partial correlations, total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were each inversely associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (P<0.001). Men with categorical hypertension (SBP> or =140 or diastolic blood pressure (DBP)> or =90 mmHg) had lower levels of total and free testosterone and SHBG before (P<0.001, P=0.011 and P<0.001, respectively) and after (P<0.001, P=0.035 and P=0.002, respectively) adjusting for body mass index (BMI). Total testosterone and SHBG were each inversely associated with left ventricular mass (P<0.001), and men with left ventricular hypertrophy had significantly lower levels of total testosterone (P=0.042) and SHBG (P=0.006); these associations were no longer significant after adjusting for BMI. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study are consistent with the hypothesis that lower levels of testosterone in men are associated with higher blood pressure, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The reduced associations after adjusting for BMI suggest that the association of low testosterone levels with blood pressure and left ventricular mass is mediated by obesity.