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Hervé Lefevre, Claire Bouvattier, Najiba Lahlou, Catherine Adamsbaum, Pierre Bougnères and Jean-Claude Carel

Background: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps, mucocutaneous pigmentation and increased predisposition to various neoplasms. Endocrine manifestations in PJS include gynecomastia due to calcified Sertoli cell testicular tumors usually referred to as large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LSCT).

Objective: To evaluate the value of endocrine markers and aromatase inhibitor treatment in children with PJS and LSCT.

Design and setting: Familial cases, followed in a tertiary care center.

Patients: Two male siblings aged 7 and 9 years with PJS and LSCT.

Intervention: Third generation aromatase inhibitor (anastrozole) in one of the patients.

Main outcome measures: Longitudinal measurements of sex-steroids, gonadotropins, Sertoli cell markers and auxological evaluation.

Results: The two male siblings with PJS had similar bilateral multifocal testicular calcifications and biochemical evidence of Sertoli cell dysfunction manifested by elevated plasma inhibin-α levels. Only one sibling had gynecomastia. Estradiol levels were normal in both. During treatment with anastrozole, estradiol levels, growth and skeletal maturation, as well as Sertoli cell markers (inhibin B, inhibin-α and anti-Mullerian hormone) decreased.

Conclusions: Inhibin-α may be considered as a marker for LSCT in children with PJS, pointing to a specific defect in inhibin regulation in this condition. Moreover, the decrease in Sertoli cell markers during aromatase inhibitor treatment suggests that increased estrogen production is a primary event regulating downstream production of Sertoli cell peptides. Anastrozole is efficient in controlling the clinical features of the disease and should be proposed as an alternative to bilateral orchidectomy, which is often performed in this condition.

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Laetitia Martinerie, Yves Morel, Claire-Lise Gay, Catherine Pienkowski, Marc de Kerdanet, Sylvie Cabrol, Claudine Lecointre, Regis Coutant, Sabine Baron, Michel Colle, Raja Brauner, Elisabeth Thibaud, Juliane Leger, Claire Nihoul-Fekete and Claire Bouvattier

Context

Gender assignment followed by surgery and hormonal therapy is a difficult decision in the management of 45,X/46,XY patients with abnormal external genitalia at birth considering the paucity of studies evaluating pubertal development and fertility outcome, most notably for patients raised as boys.

Objective

The purpose of this study was to describe the pubertal course of 20 45,X/46,XY patients born with ambiguous genitalia and raised as boys.

Methods

This is a multicenter retrospective study.

Results

Mean age at study was 25.6±2.4 years. Eighty-five percent of the patients presented a ‘classical’ mixed gonadal dysgenetic phenotype at birth. Puberty was initially spontaneous in all but three boys, although in six other patients, testosterone therapy was subsequently necessary for completion of puberty. Sixty-seven percent of the remaining patients presented signs of declined testicular function at the end of puberty (increased levels of FSH and low levels of testosterone and/or inhibin B). Moreover, an abnormal structure of the Y chromosome, known to alter fertility, was found in 10 out of 16 (63%) patients. Two patients developed testicular cancer. Half of the patients have adult penile length of <80 mm. Mean adult height is 156.9±2 cm, regardless of GH treatment.

Conclusions

In summary, 45,X/46,XY children born with ambiguous genitalia and raised as boys have an altered pubertal course and impaired fertility associated with adult short stature, which should, therefore, be taken into consideration for the management of these patients.

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Anne Bachelot, Jean Louis Golmard, Jérôme Dulon, Nora Dahmoune, Monique Leban, Claire Bouvattier, Sylvie Cabrol, Juliane Leger, Michel Polak and Philippe Touraine

Aim

Adverse outcomes in adult congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients are frequent. The determinants of them have not yet been established.

Objective

To establish the prevalence of adverse outcomes and to find determining factors for each of them.

Design, patients, and methods

Cross-sectional monocentric study of 104 patients with childhood onset of CAH (71 women, 33 men). Analysis established first the determinants of clinical, hormonal, genetic variables and second a composite criterion for some of the outcomes and determinants.

Results

BMI was above 25 kg/m2 in 44% of the cohort, adrenal hyperplasia and/or nodules were present in 45% of the patients, and irregular menstrual cycles and hyperandrogenism were found in 50 and 35% of the women respectively. In univariate analysis, the determinants of these outcomes were all linked to disease control, especially 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) and androstenedione concentrations. Low weight was a determinant of abnormal bone mineral density (BMD) (60% of the cohort). Multivariate analysis confirmed these data. A classic form (CF) of CAH was a determinant of testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) (36% of the men). Total cumulative glucocorticoid dose was a determinant of BMI and TART, whereas fludrocortisone dose was a determinant of TART (P=0.03). In men, the composite criterion was associated with androstenedione concentration and CF. In women, the composite criterion was associated with total testosterone concentration.

Conclusion

The present study confirms the high prevalence of adverse outcomes in CAH patients. These are, most often, related to disease control. The impaired health status of adults with CAH could therefore be improved through the modification of treatment.

Free access

Zeina Chakhtoura, Anne Bachelot, Dinane Samara-Boustani, Jean-Charles Ruiz, Bruno Donadille, Jérôme Dulon, Sophie Christin-Maître, Claire Bouvattier, Marie-Charles Raux-Demay, Philippe Bouchard, Jean-Claude Carel, Juliane Leger, Frédérique Kuttenn, Michel Polak and Philippe Touraine

Objective

It remains controversial whether long-term glucocorticoids are charged of bone demineralization in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The aim of this study was to know whether cumulative glucocorticoid dose from the diagnosis in childhood to adulthood in patients with CAH had a negative impact on bone mineral density (BMD).

Design

This was a retrospective study.

Methods

Thirty-eight adult patients with classical and non-classical CAH were included. BMD was measured in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Total cumulative glucocorticoid (TCG) and total average glucocorticoid (TAG) doses were calculated from pediatric and adult files.

Results

We showed a difference between final and target heights (−0.82±0.92 s.d. for women and −1.31±0.84 s.d. for men; P<0.001). Seventeen patients (44.7%) had bone demineralization (35.7% of women and 70% of men). The 28 women had higher BMD than the 10 men for lumbar (−0.26±1.20 vs −1.25±1.33 s.d.; P=0.02) and femoral T-scores (0.21±1.30 s.d. versus −1.08±1.10 s.d.; P=0.007). In the salt-wasting group, women were almost significantly endowed with a better BMD than men (P=0.053). We found negative effects of TCG, TAG on lumbar (P<0.001, P=0.002) and femoral T-scores (P=0.006, P<0.001), predominantly during puberty. BMI was protective on BMD (P=0.006).

Conclusion

The TCG is an important factor especially during puberty for a bone demineralization in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The glucocorticoid treatment should be adapted particularly at this life period and preventive measures should be discussed in order to limit this effect.

Free access

Laurence Dumeige, Livie Chatelais, Claire Bouvattier, Marc De Kerdanet, Capucine Hyon, Blandine Esteva, Dinane Samara-Boustani, Delphine Zenaty, Marc Nicolino, Sabine Baron, Chantal Metz-Blond, Catherine Naud-Saudreau, Clémentine Dupuis, Juliane Léger, Jean-Pierre Siffroi, Bruno Donadille, Sophie Christin-Maitre, Jean-Claude Carel, Regis Coutant and Laetitia Martinerie

Objective

Few studies of patients with a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have considered those with normal male phenotype. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of 45,X/46,XY boys born with normal or minor abnormalities of external genitalia, notably in terms of growth and pubertal development.

Methods

Retrospective longitudinal study of 40 patients followed between 1982 and 2017 in France.

Results

Twenty patients had a prenatal diagnosis, whereas 20 patients had a postnatal diagnosis, mainly for short stature. Most patients had stunted growth, with abnormal growth spurt during puberty and a mean adult height of 158 ± 7.6 cm, i.e. −2.3 DS with correction for target height. Seventy percent of patients presented Turner-like syndrome features including cardiac (6/23 patients investigated) and renal malformations (3/19 patients investigated). Twenty-two patients had minor abnormalities of external genitalia. One patient developed a testicular embryonic carcinoma, suggesting evidence of partial gonadal dysgenesis. Moreover, puberty occurred spontaneously in 93% of patients but 71% (n = 5) of those evaluated at the end of puberty presented signs of declined Sertoli cell function (low inhibin B levels and increased FSH levels).

Conclusion

This study emphasizes the need to identify and follow-up 45,X/46,XY patients born with normal male phenotype until adulthood, as they present similar prognosis than those born with severe genital anomalies. Currently, most patients are diagnosed in adulthood with azoospermia, consistent with our observations of decreased testicular function at the end of puberty. Early management of these patients may lead to fertility preservation strategies.

Restricted access

Luigi Maione, Giovanna Pala, Claire Bouvattier, Séverine Trabado, Georgios Papadakis, Philippe Chanson, Jérôme Bouligand, Nelly Pitteloud, Andrew A Dwyer, Mohamad Maghnie and Jacques Young

Context

Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism/Kallmann syndrome (CHH/KS) is a rare condition characterized by gonadotropin deficiency and pubertal failure. Adult height (AH) in patients with CHH/KS has not been well studied.

Objective

To assess AH in a large cohort of patients with CHH/KS.

Patients

A total of 219 patients (165 males, 54 females). Parents and siblings were included.

Methods

AH was assessed in patients and family members. AH was compared to the general French population, mid parental target height (TH) and between patients and same-sex siblings. Delta height (∆H) was considered as the difference between AH and parental TH. ∆H was compared between patients and siblings, normosmic CHH and KS (CHH with anosmia/hyposmia), and according to underlying genetic defect. We examined the correlations between ∆H and age at diagnosis and therapeutically induced individual statural gain.

Results

Mean AH in men and women with CHH/KS was greater than that in the French general population. Patients of both sexes had AH > TH. Males with CHH/KS were significantly, albeit moderately, taller than their brothers. ∆H was higher in CHH/KS compared to unaffected siblings (+6.2 ± 7.2 cm vs +3.4 ± 5.2 cm, P < 0.0001). ∆H was positively correlated with age at diagnosis. Neither olfactory function (normosmic CHH vs KS) nor specific genetic cause impacted ∆H. Individual growth during replacement therapy inversely correlated with the age at initiation of hormonal treatment (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions

CHH/KS is associated with higher AH compared to the general population and mid-parental TH. Greater height in CHH/KS than siblings indicates that those differences are in part independent of an intergenerational effect.