Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author: Christa Meisinger x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Till Ittermann, Marcello R P Markus, Sabine Schipf, Michael Derwahl, Christa Meisinger and Henry Völzke

Objective

Data on the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and thyroid volume are sparse. An experimental study demonstrated an inhibitory effect of metformin on the growth of human thyroid cells. So far no study on humans has investigated potentially modulating effects of metformin on the association between T2DM and thyroid volume. Therefore, we investigated these effects in a population-based cohort study.

Design and methods

We used data from the Study of Health in Pomerania and included 2570 individuals for cross-sectional and 1088 individuals for longitudinal analyses. T2DM was defined by physician-diagnosed self-report or intake of antidiabetic medication.

Results

In the cross-sectional data, females with T2DM treated with antidiabetic medication other than metformin had a larger thyroid volume (β=4.69; 95% CI 1.87 to 7.50) and a higher odds ratio (OR) for goiter (OR=1.71; 95% CI 1.05 to 2.79) than females without T2DM, whereas in males, no such association was detected. In females or males treated with metformin, T2DM was not associated with thyroid volume or goiter. In longitudinal analyses, incident T2DM not treated with metformin was significantly associated with a higher risk for incident goiter in the total population (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.70; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.91). Individuals with T2DM having changed from metformin to other antidiabetic agents during follow-up also had a higher risk for incident goiter than individuals without T2DM (IRR=2.71; 95% CI 1.74 to 4.20).

Conclusions

We demonstrate an inhibitory effect of metformin on prevalent and incident goiter. Anti-goitrogenous effects of metformin add to the general benefits of metformin treatment of T2DM.

Free access

Christian Herder, D Margriet Ouwens, Maren Carstensen, Bernd Kowall, Cornelia Huth, Christa Meisinger, Wolfgang Rathmann, Michael Roden and Barbara Thorand

Objective

Reduced circulating omentin levels have been reported in obesity and type 2 diabetes, but data were mostly derived from univariate analyses in small study samples. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between omentin, abnormal glucose tolerance and related metabolic factors in a large population-based cross-sectional study.

Design and methods

Serum omentin was measured by ELISA in 1092 participants of the German KORA F4 survey (2006–2008). Associations between omentin serum levels, glucose tolerance (assessed with an oral glucose tolerance test) and diabetes-related factors were estimated using logistic and linear regression models respectively.

Results

Serum levels of omentin were not related to categories of glucose tolerance. However, serum omentin was positively associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity index (ISI (composite)) and HDL cholesterol and showed inverse associations with 2-h post-load glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance, BMI and triglycerides (all P≤0.03 after adjustment for age, sex and lifestyle factors). Further adjustment for BMI and/or serum lipids attenuated the associations with parameters of glucose metabolism, whereas adjustment for serum adiponectin virtually abolished all aforementioned associations. In contrast, adjustment for omentin had no effect on the positive association between adiponectin levels and ISI (composite).

Conclusions

The data from this large population-based cohort show that circulating omentin levels are associated with insulin sensitivity. Our observations further suggest that omentin acts via upregulation of adiponectin, which in turn affects lipid metabolism and thereby also indirectly enhances insulin sensitivity, but mechanistic studies are required to corroborate this hypothesis.

Free access

Jochen Seissler, Nina Feghelm, Cornelia Then, Christa Meisinger, Christian Herder, Wolfgang Koenig, Annette Peters, Michael Roden, Andreas Lechner, Bernd Kowall and Wolfgang Rathmann

Background

Metabolic alterations and endothelial dysfunction are interrelated processes in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) that often develop in parallel. We assessed the association of vasoactive precursor peptides (VPPs) with MetS and T2D.

Design and methods

Plasma levels of C-terminal pro-endothelin-1 (CT-proET-1) and midregional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) were measured by novel sensitive assays in 1590 participants of the population-based KORA F4 study. The association of the VPPs with T2D, MetS defined by IDF criteria, the components of MetS, and insulin resistance (IR) was assessed in logistic regression models.

Results

Elevated levels of CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM were associated with T2D, MetS, and IR in age- and sex-adjusted models. After adjustment for age, sex, former vascular complications, lifestyle factors, high-sensitive C-reactive protein, and serum creatinine, significant associations with MetS were found for MR-proADM (OR=5.94, 95% CI 3.78–9.33) and CT-proET-1 (OR=5.18, 95% CI 3.48–7.71) (top quartile vs bottom quartile). CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM were strongly associated with all components of MetS as defined by IDF criteria. After multivariable adjustment, association of CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM with pathological glucose tolerance and T2D disappeared and a borderline association with IR was found only for CT-proET-1 (OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.96–1.87).

Conclusions

We here demonstrate for the first time that plasma levels of both MR-proADM and CT-proET-1 levels are related to MetS and its components, thus suggesting that they possibly have a role as a surrogate biomarker for the disease and its complications.

Free access

Christian Herder, Thomas Illig, Jens Baumert, Martina Müller, Norman Klopp, Natalie Khuseyinova, Christa Meisinger, Ulrike Poschen, Stephan Martin, Wolfgang Koenig and Barbara Thorand

Objective

Regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/chemokine(C-C motif) ligand (CCL5) is expressed by adipocytes, and serum levels of RANTES are increased in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that RANTES is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes by analyzing the triangular association between CCL5 gene polymorphisms, systemic RANTES concentrations, and incident type 2 diabetes in a large prospective study.

Subjects and methods

The study is based on 502 individuals (293 men and 209 women) and 1632 individuals (859 men and 773 women) with and without incident type 2 diabetes from the population-based MONItoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA)/Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) case–cohort study respectively (mean follow-up time±s.d. 10.1±4.9 years). CCL5 genotypes and RANTES serum concentrations were determined and associations between genotypes, haplotypes, serum levels, and incident type 2 diabetes were assessed.

Results

Minor alleles of four single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with lower RANTES levels (P additive between 1.2×10−9 and 3.1×10−8), but neither genotypes, haplotypes, nor serum levels were associated with incident type 2 diabetes.

Conclusions

Our data suggest that RANTES/CCL5 gene variants and serum levels are not causally related with type 2 diabetes and that elevated RANTES levels in patients with type 2 diabetes may be a consequence of hyperglycemia. However, our findings cannot preclude a local role in adipose tissue where RANTES expression may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and a proinflammatory state.

Free access

Florian Lederbogen, Christine Kühner, Clemens Kirschbaum, Christa Meisinger, Josefine Lammich, Rolf Holle, Bertram Krumm, Thomas von Lengerke, Heinz-Erich Wichmann, Michael Deuschle and Karl-Heinz Ladwig

Objective

Analysis of salivary cortisol concentrations and derived indices is increasingly used in clinical and scientific medicine. However, comprehensive data on these parameters in the general population are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of salivary cortisol in a large middle-aged community sample and to identify major factors associated with altered hormone levels.

Design

We conducted a cross-sectional study within the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA)-F3 study. A total of 1484 participants aged 50–69 years (52% women) had agreed to provide four saliva samples during a regular weekday.

Methods

We measured salivary cortisol concentrations at wake-up (F0), ½ h (F½), 8 h (F8), and 14 h (F14) after waking. We calculated cortisol awakening response (CAR), slope, and area under the curve (AUCG) of the circadian cortisol secretion. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated by interview and questionnaires, sampling conditions by protocol. In total, 1208 participants returned saliva samples, exclusion criteria left 990 subjects for final analyses.

Results

Salivary cortisol levels were (means±s.d.) F0=13.7±7.6, F½=20.5±9.8, F8=5.4±3.3, and F14=2.0±1.8 nmol/l. Earlier sampling times were associated with higher CAR and smaller slope. Cortisol secretion was also influenced by gender and smoking habits. Higher perceived social support was associated with lower AUCG and smaller slope.

Conclusions

We provide data on salivary cortisol concentrations in a large middle-aged community sample. Gender, sampling time, smoking habits, and perceived social support appeared as determinants of cortisol secretion.

Free access

Christian Herder, Julia M Kannenberg, Corinna Niersmann, Cornelia Huth, Maren Carstensen-Kirberg, Clemens Wittenbecher, Matthias Schulze, Matthias Blüher, Wolfgang Rathmann, Annette Peters, Michael Roden, Christa Meisinger and Barbara Thorand

Objective

Cross-sectional studies found that higher levels of the novel adipokine omentin-1 were associated with higher adiponectin and lower levels of risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but its relevance for incident type 2 diabetes is currently not understood. Therefore this study investigated whether serum omentin-1 was associated with changes in glycaemia and incident type 2 diabetes independently of adiponectin.

Design and methods

The study was based on participants aged 62–81 years from the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) F4/FF4 cohort. Associations of baseline serum levels of omentin-1 and adiponectin with changes in glycaemia were assessed in 471 non-diabetic participants, and associations between both adipokines and incident type 2 diabetes were assessed in 76 cases and 430 non-cases (follow-up time 6.5 years). Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for multiple potential confounders.

Results

Higher serum levels of omentin-1 were associated with increases in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and HbA1c (all P < 0.001) and with incident type 2 diabetes (adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% CI): 1.40 (1.03; 1.90) per s.d. of log2-transformed omentin-1; P = 0.032). These associations were independent from adiponectin levels, which showed associations with changes in glycaemia and risk of type 2 diabetes in the opposite direction. We found no statistically significant interactions of omentin-1 with adiponectin or sex in the association with incident type 2 diabetes (all P > 0.1).

Conclusions

Systemic levels of omentin-1 were positively associated with increases in glycaemia and incident type 2 diabetes in this older population. These associations were independent of potential confounders including adiponectin.

Free access

Anke Hannemann, Christa Meisinger, Martin Bidlingmaier, Angela Döring, Barbara Thorand, Margit Heier, Petra Belcredi, Karl-Heinz Ladwig, Henri Wallaschofski, Nele Friedrich, Sabine Schipf, Jan Lüdemann, Rainer Rettig, Jörg Peters, Henry Völzke, Jochen Seissler, Felix Beuschlein, Matthias Nauck and Martin Reincke

Objective

The aim of this study was to analyze the potential association of the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in two German population-based studies.

Methods

We selected 2830 and 2901 participants (31–80 years) from the follow-ups of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)-1 and the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) F4 respectively. MetS was defined as the presence of at least three out of the following five criteria: waist circumference ≥94 cm (men (m)) and ≥80 cm (women (w)); high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol <1.0 mmol/l (m) and <1.3 mmol/l (w); blood pressure ≥130/85 mmHg or antihypertensive treatment; non-fasting glucose (SHIP-1) ≥8 mmol/l, fasting glucose (KORA F4) ≥5.55 mmol/l or antidiabetic treatment; non-fasting triglycerides (SHIP-1) ≥2.3 mmol/l, fasting triglycerides (KORA F4) ≥1.7 mmol/l, or lipid-lowering treatment. We calculated logistic regression models by comparing the highest study- and sex-specific PAC quintiles versus all lower quintiles.

Results

MetS was common with 48.1% (m) and 34.8% (w) in SHIP-1 and 42.7% (m) and 27.5% (w) in KORA F4. Our logistic regression models revealed associations of PAC with MetS, elevated triglycerides, and decreased HDL cholesterol in SHIP-1 and KORA F4.

Conclusions

Our findings add to the increasing evidence supporting a relation between aldosterone and MetS and suggest that aldosterone may be involved in the pathophysiology of MetS and lipid metabolism disorders.

Free access

Cornelia Huth, Simon Beuerle, Astrid Zierer, Margit Heier, Christian Herder, Thorsten Kaiser, Wolfgang Koenig, Florian Kronenberg, Konrad Oexle, Wolfgang Rathmann, Michael Roden, Sigrid Schwab, Jochen Seissler, Doris Stöckl, Christa Meisinger, Annette Peters and Barbara Thorand

Objective

Iron has been suggested to play a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Except for ferritin, evidence is sparse for other markers of iron metabolism that are regulated differently and might act through independent pathways. We therefore investigated the associations of serum ferritin, transferrin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), transferrin saturation (TSAT), sTfR-to-log10ferritin (sTfR-F) index, and iron with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM/‘prediabetes’), T2DM, and four continuous glucose and insulin traits.

Design and methods

Data from 2893 participants of the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) F4 study (Germany) was investigated through regression analysis. The results were adjusted for socio-demographic, life-style, and obesity measures as well as metabolic, inflammatory, and other iron biomarkers following a step-wise approach. Non-linearity was tested by adding a non-linear spline component to the model.

Results

Ferritin and transferrin were positively associated with IGM (fourth vs first sex-specific quartile: ferritin odds ratio (OR)=2.08 (95% CI 1.43–3.04) and transferrin OR=1.89 (95% CI 1.32–2.70)), T2DM (ferritin OR=1.98 (95% CI 1.22–3.22) and transferrin OR=2.42 (95% CI 1.54–3.81)), and fasting as well as 2-h glucose. TSAT (OR=0.55 (95% CI 0.34–0.88)) and iron (OR=0.61 (95% CI 0.38–0.97)) were inversely associated with T2DM, sTfR-F-index was inversely associated with IGM (OR=0.67 (95% CI 0.48–0.95)). There was no strong evidence for non-linear relationships.

Conclusions

The observed associations of several markers of iron metabolism with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance suggest that iron stores as well as iron-related metabolic pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of IGM and T2DM. Moreover, TSAT levels are decreased in T2DM patients.