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C Saïe, J Wassermann, E Mathy, N Chereau, L Leenhardt, S Tezenas du Montcel, and C Buffet

Objective

The objectives of our study were to analyze the influence of age on the survival of patients with RAIR-DTC and to determine their prognostic factors according to age.

Methods

This single-center, retrospective study enrolled 155 patients diagnosed with RAIR-DTC. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) according to different cutoff (45, 55, 65, 75 years). Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and prognostic factors in patients under and over 65 years.

Results

Median OS after RAIR diagnosis was 8.2 years (95% IC: 5.3–9.6). There was no difference according to age with a 65 (P = 0.47) and 55 years old cutoff (P = 0.28). Median OS improved significantly before 45 years old (P = 0.0043). After 75 years old, median OS significantly decreased (P = 0.0008). Median PFS was 2.1 years (95% CI: 0.8–3) in patients < 65 years old, and 1 year in patients ≥ 65 years old (95% CI: 0.8–1.55) with no statistical difference (P = 0.22). There was no impact of age on PFS with any cutoff. In both groups, progressive disease despite 131I treatment reduced OS. In patients < 65 years old, an interval of less than 3 years between the initial diagnosis and the diagnosis of RAIR metastatic disease was predictive of poor survival. In patients > 65 years old, the presence of a mediastinum metastasis was a significant factor for mortality (HR: 4.55, 95% CI: 2.27–9.09).

Conclusion

In RAIR-DTC patients, a cut-off age of 65 years old was not a significant predictive factor of survival. Forty-five and 75-years-old cutoff were predictive for OS but not PFS.

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S Cambos, K Mohammedi, F Castinetti, C Saie, J Young, P Chanson, and A Tabarin

Objective

Cushing’s disease (CD) may recur despite corticotropic insufficiency (COI) following pituitary surgery. The predictive value of the desmopressin test (DT) for recurrence in this setting remains controversial. We have evaluated whether the disappearance of the response to DT predicts a low probability recurrence in a large cohort of patients with post-operative COI.

Design

Multicentre retrospective study.

Methods

Ninety-five patients with CD (women 82%, age 41 ± 14 years), responding preoperatively to DT and with early post-operative COI (08 00 am cortisol: <138 nmol/L), underwent a DT within 3 months post-surgery. Association between DT findings and the prediction of recurrence was tested using regression and ROC analyses.

Results

Recurrence occurred in 17/95 patients within 29 to 91 months. The cortisol peak (327, 95% CI (237–417) vs 121 (79–164) nmol/L, P = 0.0001) and absolute increment during DT (208 (136–280) vs 56 (22–90) nmol/L, P = 0.005) were greater in the recurrence vs remission group. Cortisol peak (AUC: 0.786 (0.670–0.902)) and increment (0.793 (0.672–0.914)) yielded a higher prognostic performance for recurrence than did the early post-operative 08 00 am cortisol (0.655 (0.505–0.804)). In the context of COI, cortisol peak >100 nmol/L and increment >30 nmol/L had a high negative predictive value (94, 95% CI (88–100) and 94, (88–100), respectively). Patients with a cortisol peak ≤100 nmol/L (vs >100) or an increment ≤30 nmol/L (vs >30) were less likely to have CD recurrence (odds ratios: 0.12, 95% CI (0.03–0.41) and 0.11 (0.02–0.36), respectively).

Conclusion

The disappearance of the response to the post-operative DT was independently associated with a lower odds of CD recurrence and offers an incremental prognostic value, which may help to stratify patients with COI and refine their follow-up according to the risk of recurrence.