Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Anke Hannemann x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Gregor Hanslik, Henri Wallaschofski, Anna Dietz, Anna Riester, Martin Reincke, Bruno Allolio, Katharina Lang, Ivo Quack, Lars C Rump, Holger S Willenberg, Felix Beuschlein, Marcus Quinkler, Anke Hannemann and for the participants of the German Conn's Registry

Design

Abnormalities in glucose homeostasis have been described in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) but most studies show inconsistent results. Therefore, we aimed to compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in newly diagnosed PA patients to a matched control cohort of the background population.

Methods

In total, 305 PA patients of the prospective German Conn's Registry were compared to the population-based Study of Health In Pomerania (SHIP1; n=2454). A 1:1 match regarding sex, age, and BMI resulted in 269 matched pairs regarding type 2 diabetes and 183 matched pairs regarding MetS. Of the total, 153 PA patients underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) at diagnosis and 38 PA patients were reevaluated at follow-up.

Results

Type 2 diabetes and MetS were significantly more frequent in PA patients than in the control population (17.2% vs 10.4%, P=0.03; 56.8% vs 44.8%, P=0.02 respectively). Also, HbA1c levels were higher in PA patients than in controls (P<0.01). Of the total, 35.3% of non-diabetic PA patients showed an abnormal OGTT (¼ newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and ¾ impaired glucose tolerance). PA patients with an abnormal OGTT at baseline presented with significantly improved 2 h OGTT glucose (P=0.01) at follow-up. We detected a negative correlation between 2 h OGTT glucose levels and serum potassium (P<0.01).

Conclusions

Type 2 diabetes and MetS are more prevalent in patients with PA than in controls matched for sex, age, BMI, and blood pressure. This may explain in part the increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in PA patients.

Free access

Anke Hannemann, Christa Meisinger, Martin Bidlingmaier, Angela Döring, Barbara Thorand, Margit Heier, Petra Belcredi, Karl-Heinz Ladwig, Henri Wallaschofski, Nele Friedrich, Sabine Schipf, Jan Lüdemann, Rainer Rettig, Jörg Peters, Henry Völzke, Jochen Seissler, Felix Beuschlein, Matthias Nauck and Martin Reincke

Objective

The aim of this study was to analyze the potential association of the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in two German population-based studies.

Methods

We selected 2830 and 2901 participants (31–80 years) from the follow-ups of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)-1 and the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) F4 respectively. MetS was defined as the presence of at least three out of the following five criteria: waist circumference ≥94 cm (men (m)) and ≥80 cm (women (w)); high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol <1.0 mmol/l (m) and <1.3 mmol/l (w); blood pressure ≥130/85 mmHg or antihypertensive treatment; non-fasting glucose (SHIP-1) ≥8 mmol/l, fasting glucose (KORA F4) ≥5.55 mmol/l or antidiabetic treatment; non-fasting triglycerides (SHIP-1) ≥2.3 mmol/l, fasting triglycerides (KORA F4) ≥1.7 mmol/l, or lipid-lowering treatment. We calculated logistic regression models by comparing the highest study- and sex-specific PAC quintiles versus all lower quintiles.

Results

MetS was common with 48.1% (m) and 34.8% (w) in SHIP-1 and 42.7% (m) and 27.5% (w) in KORA F4. Our logistic regression models revealed associations of PAC with MetS, elevated triglycerides, and decreased HDL cholesterol in SHIP-1 and KORA F4.

Conclusions

Our findings add to the increasing evidence supporting a relation between aldosterone and MetS and suggest that aldosterone may be involved in the pathophysiology of MetS and lipid metabolism disorders.