Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author: Luigi Bartalena x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Maria Laura Tanda, Fausto Bogazzi, Enio Martino and Luigi Bartalena

Free access

Luigi Bartalena, Maria L Tanda, Eliana Piantanida and Adriana Lai

Free access

Terry J Smith and Luigi Bartalena

In this article, the two authors present their opposing points of view concerning the likelihood that glucocorticoids will be replaced by newly developed biological agents in the treatment of active, moderate-to-severe thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). TAO is a vexing, disfiguring and potentially blinding autoimmune manifestation of thyroid autoimmunity. One author expresses the opinion that steroids are nonspecific, frequently fail to improve the disease and can cause sometimes serious side effects. He suggests that glucocorticoids should be replaced as soon as possible by more specific and safer drugs, once they become available. The most promising of these are biological agents. The other author argues that glucocorticoids are proven effective and are unlikely to be replaced by biologicals. He reasons that while they may not uniformly result in optimal benefit, they have been proven effective in many reports. He remains open minded about alternative therapies such as biologicals but remains skeptical that they will replace steroids as the first-line therapy for active, moderate-to-severe TAO without head-to-head comparative clinical trials demonstrating superiority. Despite these very different points of view, both authors are optimistic about the availability of improved medical therapies for TAO, either as single agents or in combination. Further, both agree that better treatment options are needed to improve the care of our patients with active moderate-to-severe TAO.

Free access

Luca Tomisti, Giuseppe Rossi, Luigi Bartalena, Enio Martino and Fausto Bogazzi

Objective

Considering the different pathogenic mechanisms of the two main forms of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT), we ascertained whether this results in a different onset time as well.

Design and methods

We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 200 consecutive AIT patients (157 men and 43 women; mean age 62.2±12.6 years) referred to our Department from 1987 to 2012. The onset time of AIT was defined as the time elapsed from the beginning of amiodarone therapy and the first diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis, expressed in months. Factors associated with the onset time of AIT were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results

The median onset time of thyrotoxicosis was 3.5 months (95% CI 2–6 months) in patients with type 1 AIT (AIT1) and 30 months (95% CI 27–32 months, P<0.001) in those with type 2 AIT (AIT2). Of the total number of patients, 5% with AIT1 and 23% with AIT2 (P=0.007) developed thyrotoxicosis after amiodarone withdrawal. Factors affecting the onset time of thyrotoxicosis were the type of AIT and thyroid volume (TV).

Conclusions

The different pathogenic mechanisms of the two forms of AIT account for different onset times of thyrotoxicosis in the two groups. Patients with preexisting thyroid abnormalities (candidate to develop AIT1) may require a stricter follow-up during amiodarone therapy than those usually recommended. In AIT1, the onset of thyrotoxicosis after amiodarone withdrawal is rare, while AIT2 patients may require periodic tests for thyroid function longer after withdrawing amiodarone.

Free access

Elisabetta Cecconi, Maurizio Gasperi, Maura Genovesi, Fausto Bogazzi, Lucia Grasso, Filomena Cetani, Massimo Procopio, Claudio Marcocci, Luigi Bartalena and Enio Martino

Objective: To investigate, in a large group of postmenopausal primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) women, whether the concomitance of GH deficiency (GHD) may contribute to the development of changes in bone mineral density (BMD).

Design: GH secretion, bone status and metabolism were investigated in 50 postmenopausal women with PHP and in a control group of 60 women with no evidence of PHP, matched for age, age at menopause and body mass index (BMI).

Methods: GH response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)+arginine (Arg), femoral neck BMD (g/cm2) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, BMI, serum-ionized calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and markers of bone remodelling were evaluated in all patients and controls.

Results: Among PHP patients, GH secretion was reduced (8.8 ± 4.2 μg/l, range 1.1–16.5 μg/l) in 34 patients and normal (28.7 ± 11.8 μg/l, range 17.9–55.7 μg/l) in the remaining 16 (P < 0.05), no women in the control group had GHD (peak GH 33.8 ± 10.9 μg/l, range 21.7 ± 63.2 μg/l). Osteoporosis (T-score < − 2.5) and osteopenia (T-score > −2.5 and < −1) were found in 73.5 and 17.6% of GHD patients, in 37.5 and 43.7% of patients with normal GH secretion and 3.1 and 27% of controls. T-score and BMD were not correlated with ionized calcium, age, age at menopause, BMI, GH peak and IGF-I but were correlated with serum PTH levels in both groups. T-score was correlated with serum levels of markers of bone remodelling only in PHP patients with GHD.

Conclusions: Concomitant impairment of GH secretion may play a pathogenetic role in the occurrence of changes in bone mass observed in PHP and contribute to make them more severe.

Free access

Claudio Marcocci, Torquil Watt, Maria Antonietta Altea, Ase Krogh Rasmussen, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Jacques Orgiazzi, Luigi Bartalena and for the European Group of Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO)

Objective

The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO).

Design

A questionnaire-based survey among members of the European Thyroid Association (ETA) who treat GO.

Results

A response was obtained from 128 ETA members of which 115 used GC therapy for GO. The majority of respondents (83/115, 72%) used intravenous (i.v.) GC, with a relatively wide variety of therapeutic regimens. The cumulative dose of methylprednisolone ranged between 0.5 and 12 g (median 4.5 g) for i.v.GC and between 1.0 and 4.9 g (median 2.4 g) for oral GC. Adverse events were often reported during oral GCs (26/32, 81%); most side effects were non-severe, but ten respondents reported severe adverse events (hepatic, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular complications), including two fatal cases, both receiving a total of 2.3 g prednisone. Adverse events were less common in i.v.GC (32/83 respondents, 39%), but mostly consisted of severe events, including seven fatal cases. All but one fatal event occurred in cumulative i.v.GC doses (>8 g) higher than those currently recommended.

Conclusions

GCs are preferentially administered i.v. for the treatment of GO in Europe. Both oral and i.v.GC may be associated with severe adverse effects, including fatal cases, which are more frequently reported in daily or alternate day i.v.GC. IvGC therapy should be undertaken in centers with appropriate expertise. Patients should be carefully examined for risk factors before treatment and monitored for side effects, which may be asymptomatic, both during and after treatment.

Free access

Luigi Bartalena, Lelio Baldeschi, Alison Dickinson, Anja Eckstein, Pat Kendall-Taylor, Claudio Marcocci, Maarten Mourits, Petros Perros, Kostas Boboridis, Antonella Boschi, Nicola Currò, Chantal Daumerie, George J Kahaly, Gerasimos E Krassas, Carol M Lane, John H Lazarus, Michele Marinò, Marco Nardi, Christopher Neoh, Jacques Orgiazzi, Simon Pearce, Aldo Pinchera, Susanne Pitz, Mario Salvi, Paolo Sivelli, Matthias Stahl, Georg von Arx and Wilmar M Wiersinga

Free access

Wilmar Wiersinga, Miloš Žarković, Luigi Bartalena, Simone Donati, Petros Perros, Onyebuchi Okosieme, Daniel Morris, Nicole Fichter, Jurg Lareida, Georg von Arx, Chantal Daumerie, Maria-Christina Burlacu, George Kahaly, Susanne Pitz, Biljana Beleslin, Jasmina Ćirić, Goksun Ayvaz, Onur Konuk, Füsun Balos̜ Törüner, Mario Salvi, Danila Covelli, Nicola Curro, Laszlo Hegedüs, Thomas Brix and EUGOGO (European Group on Graves’ Orbitopathy)

Objective

To construct a predictive score for the development or progression of Graves’ orbitopathy (GO) in Graves’ hyperthyroidism (GH).

Design

Prospective observational study in patients with newly diagnosed GH, treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD) for 18 months at ten participating centers from EUGOGO in 8 European countries.

Methods

348 patients were included with untreated GH but without obvious GO. Mixed effects logistic regression was used to determine the best predictors. A predictive score (called PREDIGO) was constructed.

Results

GO occurred in 15% (mild in 13% and moderate to severe in 2%), predominantly at 6–12 months after start of ATD. Independent baseline determinants for the development of GO were clinical activity score (assigned 5 points if score > 0), TSH-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (2 points if TBII 2–10 U/L, 5 points if TBII > 10 U/L), duration of hyperthyroid symptoms (1 point if 1–4 months, 3 points if >4 months) and smoking (2 points if current smoker). Based on the odds ratio of each of these four determinants, a quantitative predictive score (called PREDIGO) was constructed ranging from 0 to 15 with higher scores denoting higher risk; positive and negative predictive values were 0.28 (95% CI 0.20–0.37) and 0.91 (95% CI 0.87–0.94) respectively.

Conclusions

In patients without GO at diagnosis, 15% will develop GO (13% mild, 2% moderate to severe) during subsequent treatment with ATD for 18 months. A predictive score called PREDIGO composed of four baseline determinants was better in predicting those patients who will not develop obvious GO than who will.