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Open access

Annamaria Colao, Marcello D Bronstein, Thierry Brue, Laura De Marinis, Maria Fleseriu, Mirtha Guitelman, Gerald Raverot, Ilan Shimon, Jürgen Fleck, Pritam Gupta, Alberto M Pedroncelli, and Mônica R Gadelha

Objective

In the Phase III PAOLA study (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01137682), enrolled patients had uncontrolled acromegaly despite ≥6 months of octreotide/lanreotide treatment before study start. More patients achieved biochemical control with long-acting pasireotide versus continued treatment with octreotide/lanreotide (active control) at month 6. The current work assessed the extent of comorbidities at baseline and outcomes during a long-term extension.

Design/methods

Patients receiving pasireotide 40 or 60 mg at core study end could continue on the same dose in an extension phase if biochemically controlled or receive pasireotide 60 mg if uncontrolled. Uncontrolled patients on active control were switched to pasireotide 40 mg, with the dose increased at week 16 of the extension if still uncontrolled (crossover group). Efficacy and safety are reported to 304 weeks (~5.8 years) for patients randomized to pasireotide (core + extension), and 268 weeks for patients in the crossover group (extension only).

Results

Almost half (49.5%; 98/198) of patients had ≥3 comorbidities at core baseline. During the extension, 173 patients received pasireotide. Pasireotide effectively and consistently reduced GH and IGF-I levels for up to 5.8 years’ treatment; 37.0% of patients achieved GH <1.0 µg/L and normal IGF-I at some point during the core or extension. Improvements were observed in key symptoms. The long-term safety profile was similar to that in the core study; 23/173 patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events.

Conclusions

In this patient population with a high burden of comorbid illness, pasireotide was well tolerated and efficacious, providing prolonged maintenance of biochemical control and improving symptoms.

Open access

Maria Fleseriu, Dagmar Führer-Sakel, Aart J van der Lely, Laura De Marinis, Thierry Brue, Joli van der Lans-Bussemaker, Judith Hey-Hadavi, Cecilia Camacho-Hubner, Michael P Wajnrajch, Srinivas Rao Valluri, Andrew Anthony Palladino, Roy Gomez, and Roberto Salvatori

Objective

To report the final long-term safety and efficacy analyses of patients with acromegaly treated with pegvisomant from the ACROSTUDY.

Design

Global (15 countries), multicentre, non-interventional study (2004–2017).

Methods

The complete ACROSTUDY cohort comprised patients with acromegaly, who were being treated with pegvisomant (PEGV) prior to the study or at enrolment. The main endpoints were long-term safety (comorbidities, adverse events (AEs), pituitary tumour volumes, liver tests) and efficacy (IGF1 changes).

Results

Patients (n = 2221) were treated with PEGV for a median of 9.3 years (range, 0–20.8 years) and followed up for a median of 7.4 years (range, 0–13.9 years). Before PEGV, 96.3% had received other acromegaly treatments (surgery/radiotherapy/medications). Before PEGV treatment, 87.2% of patients reported comorbidities. During ACROSTUDY, 5567 AEs were reported in 56.5% of patients and of these 613 were considered treatment-related (in 16.5% of patients) and led to drug withdrawal in 1.3%. Pituitary imaging showed a tumour size increase in 7.1% of patients; the majority (71.1%) reported no changes. Abnormal AST or ALT liver tests occurred in 3.2% of patients. IGF1 normalization rate improved over time, increasing from 11.4% at PEGV start to 53.7% at year 1, and reaching 75.4% at year 10 with the use of ≥30 mg PEGV/day in an increasing proportion of patients.

Conclusion

This comprehensive review of the complete cohort in ACROSTUDY confirmed the overall favourable benefit-to-risk profile and high efficacy of PEGV as mono- and combination therapy in patients with an aggressive course/uncontrolled/active acromegaly requiring long-term medical therapy for control.

Open access

Peter J Trainer, John D C Newell-Price, John Ayuk, Simon J B Aylwin, Aled Rees, William Drake, Philippe Chanson, Thierry Brue, Susan M Webb, Carmen Fajardo, Javier Aller, Ann I McCormack, David J Torpy, George Tachas, Lynne Atley, David Ryder, and Martin Bidlingmaier

Objective

ATL1103 is a second-generation antisense oligomer targeting the human growth hormone (GH) receptor. This phase 2 randomised, open-label, parallel-group study assessed the potential of ATL1103 as a treatment for acromegaly.

Design

Twenty-six patients with active acromegaly (IGF-I >130% upper limit of normal) were randomised to subcutaneous ATL1103 200 mg either once or twice weekly for 13 weeks and monitored for a further 8-week washout period.

Methods

The primary efficacy measures were change in IGF-I at week 14, compared to baseline and between cohorts. For secondary endpoints (IGFBP3, acid labile subunit (ALS), GH, growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP)), comparison was between baseline and week 14. Safety was assessed by reported adverse events.

Results and conclusions

Baseline median IGF-I was 447 and 649 ng/mL in the once- and twice-weekly groups respectively. Compared to baseline, at week 14, twice-weekly ATL1103 resulted in a median fall in IGF-I of 27.8% (P = 0.0002). Between cohort comparison at week 14 demonstrated the median fall in IGF-I to be 25.8% (P = 0.0012) greater with twice-weekly dosing. In the twice-weekly cohort, IGF-I was still declining at week 14, and remained lower at week 21 than at baseline by a median of 18.7% (P = 0.0005). Compared to baseline, by week 14, IGFBP3 and ALS had declined by a median of 8.9% (P = 0.027) and 16.7% (P = 0.017) with twice-weekly ATL1103; GH had increased by a median of 46% at week 14 (P = 0.001). IGFBP3, ALS and GH did not change with weekly ATL1103. GHBP fell by a median of 23.6% and 48.8% in the once- and twice-weekly cohorts (P = 0.027 and P = 0.005) respectively. ATL1103 was well tolerated, although 84.6% of patients experienced mild-to-moderate injection-site reactions. This study provides proof of concept that ATL1103 is able to significantly lower IGF-I in patients with acromegaly.