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Free access

Claire Chambre, Emily McMurray, Camille Baudry, Marine Lataud, Laurence Guignat, Sébastien Gaujoux, Najiba Lahlou, Jean Guibourdenche, Frédérique Tissier, Mathilde Sibony, Bertrand Dousset, Xavier Bertagna, Jérôme Bertherat, Paul Legmann, and Lionel Groussin

Context

Computed tomography (CT) unenhanced attenuation value of <10 Hounsfield units (HU) has an excellent specificity (98%) to diagnose lipid-rich adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with a weaker sensitivity (71%).

Objective

To determine from a routine clinical perspective if unenhanced attenuation value is influenced by cortisol secretion in ACAs.

Design

This was a retrospective study of cases collected between 2009 and 2012.

Setting

This study was conducted in a tertiary-care university hospital.

Patients

Seventy-two patients operated on for an ACA (Weiss score ≤2) were analysed. Thirty-four patients had an ACA oversecreting cortisol (Cush-ACA). Thirty-eight patients had an ACA without cortisol oversecretion (Non Hyper-ACA).

Main outcome measure

CT unenhanced attenuation value was correlated with the functional status. The Weiss score items were analysed.

Results

Among the 34 patients with a Cush-ACA a minority (n=7) had an unenhanced attenuation value under 10 HU. Among the high precontrast density (>10 HU) Cush-ACAs, washout analysis after contrast administration was consistent with the benign nature of the tumor in ∼60% of the cases. Less than 25% clear cells (lipid-rich cells), a Weiss score item, was present in 50% of the Cush-ACAs in favour of a lipid-poor content.

Conclusions

Unenhanced attenuation value has a poor sensitivity to diagnose an ACA in case of cortisol oversecretion due to poor lipid content. Nevertheless, the accuracy of washout analysis was preserved in the group of Cush-ACAs.

Restricted access

Bertrand Baussart, Chiara Villa, Anne Jouinot, Marie-Laure Raffin-Sanson, Luc Foubert, Laure Cazabat, Michèle Bernier, Fideline Bonnet, Anthony Dohan, Jerome Bertherat, Guillaume Assié, and Stephan Gaillard

Objective

Microprolactinomas are currently treated with dopamine agonists. Outcome information on microprolactinoma patients treated by surgery is limited. This study reports the first large series of consecutive non-invasive microprolactinoma patients treated by pituitary surgery and evaluates the efficiency and safety of this treatment.

Design

Follow-up of a cohort of consecutive patients treated by surgery.

Methods

Between January 2008 and October 2020, 114 adult patients with pure microprolactinomas were operated on in a single tertiary expert neurosurgical department, using an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. Eligible patients presented with a microprolactinoma with no obvious cavernous invasion on MRI. Prolactin was assayed before and after surgery. Disease-free survival was modeled using Kaplan–Meier representation. A cox regression model was used to predict remission.

Results

Median follow-up was 18.2 months (range: 2.8–155). In this cohort, 14/114 (12%) patients were not cured by surgery, including ten early surgical failures and four late relapses occurring 37.4 months (33–41.8) after surgery. From Kaplan–Meier estimates, 1-year and 5-year disease free survival was 90.9% (95% CI: 85.6–96.4%) and 81% (95% CI: 71.2–92.1%) respectively. The preoperative prolactinemia was the only significant preoperative predictive factor for remission (P < 0.05). No severe complication was reported, with no anterior pituitary deficiency after surgery, one diabetes insipidus, and one postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage properly treated by muscle plasty.

Conclusions

In well-selected microprolactinoma patients, pituitary surgery performed by an expert neurosurgical team is a valid first-line alternative treatment to dopamine agonists.

Free access

Lucie Allard, Frédérique Albarel, Jérôme Bertherat, Philippe Jean Caron, Christine Cortet, Carine Courtillot, Brigitte Delemer, Christel Jublanc, Dominique Maiter, Marie Laure Nunes, Gerald Raverot, Julie Sarfati, Sylvie Salenave, Emmanuelle Corruble, Walid Choucha, and Philippe Chanson

Context

In patients treated with antipsychotics, the rare occurrence of a macroprolactinoma represents a therapeutic challenge.

Objective

Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and psychiatric safety of dopamine agonists (DAs) prescribed for large macroprolactinomas in patients with psychosis treated with antipsychotics.

Design

This was a multicenter (France and Belgium) retrospective study.

Patients

Eighteen patients treated with antipsychotics were included.

Results

Under DA, median PRL levels decreased from 1247 (117–81 132) to 42 (4–573) ng/mL (P = 0.008), from 3850 (449–38 000) to 141 (60–6000) ng/mL (P = 0.037) and from 1664 (94–9400) to 1215 (48–5640) ng/mL (P = 0.56) when given alone (n = 8), before surgery (n = 7), or after surgery (n = 6), respectively. The prolactinoma median largest diameter decreased by 28% (0–57) in patients under DAs alone (P = 0.02) but did not change when given after surgery. Optic chiasm decompression was achieved in 82% of patients. Five patients (28%) were admitted for psychotic relapse while receiving DAs (but three of them had stopped antipsychotic treatment at that time). A more severe underlying psychosis, rather than the DA treatment itself, may explain such psychiatric admissions.

Conclusion

Even if the DA efficacy on PRL levels and tumor volume in patients with macroprolactinoma under antipsychotic drugs is less impressive than that typically observed, it may be considered satisfactory for half of our patients, particularly in cases of optic chiasm compression. Psychotic exacerbation was unusual in these patients, occurring mostly in those with the most severe psychotic forms. DAs may therefore be used as antitumor treatment for macroprolactinoma in patients with visual involvement, severe headaches or invasion into the skull base who receive antipsychotics.

Free access

Luis G Pérez-Rivas, Marily Theodoropoulou, Troy H Puar, Julia Fazel, Mareike R Stieg, Francesco Ferraù, Guillaume Assié, Monica R Gadelha, Timo Deutschbein, Maria C Fragoso, Benno Kusters, Wolfgang Saeger, Jürgen Honegger, Michael Buchfelder, Márta Korbonits, Jérôme Bertherat, Günter K Stalla, Ad R Hermus, Felix Beuschlein, and Martin Reincke

Objective

Somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene are frequent in corticotroph tumors causing Cushing’s disease (CD). Corticotroph tumor progression, the so-called Nelson’s syndrome (NS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of bilateral adrenalectomy in patients with refractory CD that is caused by the development of an ACTH-secreting tumor of the pituitary gland. Whether USP8 alterations are also present in progressive Nelson’s tumors has not been studied in detail so far.

Design and Methods

Retrospective, multicenter study involving tumors from 33 patients with progressive corticotroph tumors (29 females) and screening for somatic mutations on the mutational hotspot of the USP8 gene in the exon 14 with Sanger sequencing.

Results

Fifteen out of 33 tumors (45%) presented with a mutation in the exon 14 of USP8, with c.2159C>A (p.Pro720Gln) being the most frequent (9/33), followed by c.2155_2157delTCC (p.Ser718del, 4/33) and c.2152T>C (p.Ser718Pro, 2/33). This prevalence is similar to that previously reported for CD. Mutations were found exclusively in females. Other variables, such as age at diagnosis with NS, body mass index, hyperpigmentation, visual field defects, adenoma size or mortality, did not significantly differ between patients with wild-type and mutant tumors. Patients with USP8 mutant tumors exhibited higher levels of plasma ACTH after surgery (median: 640 vs 112 pg/mL, P = 0.03). No differences were observed in ACTH normalization (<50 pg/mL) and tumor control after surgery for Nelson’s tumor.

Conclusion

Somatic mutations in USP8 are common in Nelson’s tumors, indicating that they do not drive the corticotroph tumor progression that leads to NS, and may be associated with a less favorable biochemical outcome after surgery for Nelson’s tumor.

Open access

Roberta Armignacco, Anne Jouinot, Lucas Bouys, Amandine Septier, Thomas Lartigue, Mario Neou, Cassandra Gaspar, Karine Perlemoine, Leah Braun, Anna Riester, Fidéline Bonnet-Serrano, Anne Blanchard, Laurence Amar, Carla Scaroni, Filippo Ceccato, Gian Paolo Rossi, Tracy Ann Williams, Casper K Larsen, Stéphanie Allassonnière, Maria-Christina Zennaro, Felix Beuschlein, Martin Reincke, Jérôme Bertherat, and Guillaume Assié

Objective

Cushing’s syndrome represents a state of excessive glucocorticoids related to glucocorticoid treatments or to endogenous hypercortisolism. Cushing’s syndrome is associated with high morbidity, with significant inter-individual variability. Likewise, adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition of cortisol deprivation. Currently, hormone assays contribute to identify Cushing’s syndrome or adrenal insufficiency. However, no biomarker directly quantifies the biological glucocorticoid action. The aim of this study was to identify such markers.

Design

We evaluated whole blood DNA methylome in 94 samples obtained from patients with different glucocorticoid states (Cushing’s syndrome, eucortisolism, adrenal insufficiency). We used an independent cohort of 91 samples for validation.

Methods

Leukocyte DNA was obtained from whole blood samples. Methylome was determined using the Illumina methylation chip array (~850 000 CpG sites). Both unsupervised (principal component analysis) and supervised (Limma) methods were used to explore methylome profiles. A Lasso-penalized regression was used to select optimal discriminating features.

Results

Whole blood methylation profile was able to discriminate samples by their glucocorticoid status: glucocorticoid excess was associated with DNA hypomethylation, recovering within months after Cushing’s syndrome correction. In Cushing’s syndrome, an enrichment in hypomethylated CpG sites was observed in the region of FKBP5 gene locus. A methylation predictor of glucocorticoid excess was built on a training cohort and validated on two independent cohorts. Potential CpG sites associated with the risk for specific complications, such as glucocorticoid-related hypertension or osteoporosis, were identified, needing now to be confirmed on independent cohorts.

Conclusions

Whole blood DNA methylome is dynamically impacted by glucocorticoids. This biomarker could contribute to better assessment of glucocorticoid action beyond hormone assays.

Restricted access

Elisa Deflorenne, Michel Peuchmaur, Delphine Vezzosi, Christiane Ajzenberg, Laurent Brunaud, Nicolas Chevalier, Sophie Christin-Maitre, Bénédicte Decoudier, Natacha Driessens, Delphine D Drui, Olivier Gilly, Pierre Goudet, Frédéric Illouz, Christel Jublanc, Hervé Lefebvre, Antoine-Guy Lopez, Charlotte Lussey, Aurelien Morini, Marie-Laure Raffin-Sanson, Isabelle Raingeard, Peggy Renoult-Pierre, Caroline Storey, Antoine Tabarin, Marie Christine Vantyghem, Emmanuelle Vidal-Petiot, Eric Baudin, Jerome Bertherat, and Laurence Amar

Objective

Adrenal ganglioneuromas are rare, differentiated, neuroblastic tumors that originate from the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Because of their rarity, information is limited, derived from small cases series. Our objective was to characterize this tumor and provide help for its management.

Methods

A retrospective multicenter analysis of adrenal ganglioneuromas from 20 French centers belonging to the COMETE network and one Belgian center.

Results

Among the 104 cases identified, 59.6% were women (n = 62/104), median age at diagnosis was 29 years, with 24 pediatric cases. 60.6% (n = 63/104) were incidentalomas. Ganglioneuromas were non-secreting tumors in 90.8% of cases (n = 89/98), whereas the preoperative hormonal evaluation was indeterminate for 9.2% of patients (n = 9/98). CT imaging, performed on 96 patients, revealed large tumors (median diameter of 50 mm) with a non-contrast density > 10 Hounsfield units in 98.1% (n = 52/53) and calcifications in 64.6% of cases (n = 31/48). Increased uptake on 123I-MIBG scintigraphy and 18F-FDG-PET/CT was observed in 26.7% (n = 8/30) and 42.2% (n = 19/45) of the tumors, respectively. All 104 patients underwent surgery. No recurrence was observed among the 42 patients who had an imaging follow-up (mean 29.6 months, median 18 months (4–156)).

Conclusion

Adrenal ganglioneuromas are large tumors, mostly nonfunctioning, without benign imaging features. Although the duration of follow-up was limited in our series, no recurrence was identified. A review of the literature confirms the absence of postoperative recurrence. Based on all available data, in the absence of special circumstances (genetic form, uncertain histological diagnosis), long-term follow-up is not necessary after complete surgery for patients with an adrenal ganglioneuroma.

Free access

Jacques Young, Jérôme Bertherat, Marie Christine Vantyghem, Olivier Chabre, Salima Senoussi, Rita Chadarevian, Frédéric Castinetti, and the Compassionalte use Programme

Objective

Ketoconazole (KTZ) is one of few available treatments for Cushing’s syndrome (CS). Although KTZ has been associated with severe hepatotoxicity, little information is available about hepatic safety in CS. The aim of this study was to document changes in liver function in patients with CS treated with KTZ.

Design

An observational prospective French cohort study (Compassionate Use Programme (CUP)).

Methods

Enrolled patients were stratified into a KTZ-naive cohort and a cohort already treated by another formulation of ketoconazole (KTZ-switch cohort). Liver function markers (alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase and bilirubin) were monitored at regular intervals. Patients with ALT > 3 × ULN (upper limit of normal), total bilirubin > 2 × ULN or both ALP > 2 × ULN and ALT > ULN were considered to have liver injury.

Results

Overall, 108 patients were analysed (47 KTZ-naïve; 61 KTZ-switch). The median KTZ dose was 600 mg/day. Most abnormalities observed were asymptomatic mild increases of liver enzymes. Four patients in the KTZ-naïve cohort (8.5%) and two in the KTZ-switch cohort (3.3%) developed liver injury, considered related to KTZ in three cases (all KTZ-naïve in the first month of treatment). Five patients had mild liver function abnormalities at baseline and two had proven liver metastases. Two patients recovered on discontinuation of KTZ and the remaining patient died of unrelated causes.

Conclusions

These findings highlight the need for close monitoring of liver enzymes especially during the first six months of treatment. Liver enzyme abnormalities usually occurred within four weeks were asymptomatic and could be reversed on timely discontinuation of KTZ.