Browse

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 19,803 items for

Restricted access

Lorena Guimaraes Lima Amato, Luciana Ribeiro Montenegro, Antonio Marcondes Lerario, Alexander Augusto Lima Jorge, Gil Guerra Junior, Caroline Schnoll, Alessandra Covallero Renck, Ericka Barbosa Trarbach, Elaine Maria Frade Costa, Berenice Bilharinho Mendonca, Ana Claudia Latronico and Leticia Ferreira Gontijo Silveira

Context

Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare condition caused by GnRH deficiency. Several genes have been associated with the pathogenesis of CHH, but most cases still remain without a molecular diagnosis. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has allowed the simultaneous genotyping of several regions, faster, making possible the extension of the genetic knowledge of CHH.

Objective

Genetic characterization of a large cohort of Brazilian CHH patients.

Design and patients

A cohort of 130 unrelated patients (91 males, 39 females) with CHH (75 normosmic CHH, 55 Kallmann syndrome) was studied using a panel containing 36 CHH-associated genes.

Results

Potential pathogenic or probably pathogenic variants were identified in 43 (33%) CHH patients. The genes ANOS1, FGFR1 and GNRHR were the most frequently affected. A novel homozygous splice site mutation was identified in the GNRH1 gene and a deletion of the entire coding sequence was identified in SOX10. Deleterious variants in the IGSF10 gene were identified in two patients with reversible normosmic CHH. Notably, 6.9% of the patients had rare variants in more than one gene. Rare variants were also identified in SPRY4, IL17RD, FGF17, IGSF1 and FLRT3 genes.

Conclusions

This is a large study of the molecular genetics of CHH providing new genetic findings for this complex and heterogeneous genetic condition. NGS has been shown to be a fast, reliable and effective tool in the molecular diagnosis of congenital CHH and being able to targeting clinical genetic testing in the future.

Restricted access

Woo Kyung Lee, Jandee Lee, Hyunji Kim, Seul Gi Lee, Sun Hyung Choi, Seonhyang Jeong, Hyeong Ju Kwon, Sang Geun Jung and Young Suk Jo

Objective

Tumor location in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) might determine tumor outgrowth from the thyroid gland. However, the clinical implications of tumor location and minimal extrathyroid extension (mETE) have not been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the relationship between tumor location and mETE to predict the aggressiveness of PTMC.

Methods

A total of 858 patients with PTMC were grouped according to tumor location on ultrasonography: central (cPTMC) and peripheral PTMC (pPTMC). PTMC without mETE (PTMC-mETE(−)) was divided further according to margin shape: encapsulated (E−) or infiltrative (I−). To understand the molecular biologic characteristics of PTMC presenting with an I-margin and mETE, transcriptome data from TCGA-THCA were analyzed using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA).

Results

pPTMC (n = 807, 94.1%) accounted for the majority of cases; mETE was identified only in pPTMC (403/807; 49.9%). pPTMC-mETE(+) showed aggressive clinical characteristics that increased the odds ratio (OR) for lymph node metastasis (LNM). Interestingly, subgroup analysis of PTMC-mETE(−) revealed that the I-margin also increased the OR for LNM, independent of other clinical factors. GSEA of TCGA-THCA data suggested coordinated upregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PTC with mETE. Immunohistochemical staining for laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2), CD59, E-cadherin and vimentin showed that these markers of EMT were associated with progressive changes in E-margin PTMC-mETE(−), I-margin PTMC-mETE(−) and pPTMC-mETE(+).

Conclusion

mETE related to peripheral location of PTMC is an important predictor of tumor invasiveness, as is the I-margin, which presents with EMT features similar to mETE. I-margin PTMC-mETE(−) and pPTMC-mETE(+) might reflect the pattern of invasive PTMC.

Restricted access

Alena Welters, Ranna El-Khairi, Antonia Dastamani, Nadine Bachmann, Carsten Bergmann, Clare Gilbert, Emma Clement, Jane A Hurst, Nada Quercia, Jonathan D Wasserman, Thomas Meissner, Pratik Shah and Sebastian Kummer

Objective

Genetic aetiology remains unknown in up to 50% of patients with persistent hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH). Several syndromes are associated with HH. We report Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS) as one of the possible causes of persistent HH. Early diagnosis and treatment of HH is crucial to prevent hypoglycaemic brain injury.

Design

Four RSTS patients with HH were retrospectively analysed.

Methods

Genetic investigations included next-generation sequencing-based gene panels and exome sequencing. Clinical characteristics, metabolic profile during hypoglycaemia and treatment were reviewed.

Results

Disease-related EP300 or CREBBP variants were found in all patients, no pathogenic variants were found in a panel of genes associated with non-syndromic HH. Two patients had classic manifestations of RSTS, three had choanal atresia or stenosis. Diagnosis of HH varied from 1 day to 18 months of age. One patient was unresponsive to treatment with diazoxide, octreotide and nifedipine, but responded to sirolimus. All required gastrostomy feeding.

Conclusions

Given the rarity of RSTS (1:125 000) and HH (1:50 000), our observations indicate an association between these two conditions. We therefore recommend that clinicians should be vigilant in screening for HH in symptomatic infants with RSTS. In children with an apparent syndromic form of HH, RSTS should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

Restricted access

Ying Sun, Jiao Fang, Yuhui Wan, Puyu Su and Fangbiao Tao

Objective

Previous finding suggests that children growing up under chronic stress tend to experience earlier sexual maturity. The present study aims to examine polygenic risk by experience interaction in predicting pubertal timing, as well as provide insight regarding the relevance of two G × E paradigms.

Design and methods

Data were analyzed from a 3-year prospective puberty cohort in Anhui Province, China. Breast Tanner stage and testicular volume (TV) of 997 children were annually assessed. The polygenic risk score (PRS) was computed based on 17 SNPs for early pubertal timing. Hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) were assessed in the first 3 cm hair segment as a biological marker of chronic stress.

Results

Comparing with participants under moderate levels of stress as measured by HCC, the puberty-accelerating effects of chronic stress were only observed among girls with moderate (1.7 months earlier, P = 0.007) and low genetic susceptibility (2.2 months earlier, P < 0.001) and among boys with high genetic susceptibility (2.0 months earlier, P = 0.005). Polygenic differences (PRSs) in age at thelarche was most prominent in those with low levels of stress by HCC (9.06, 9.36 and 9.53 years for high, moderate and low PRS, respectively; F = 105.06, P < 0.0001), while polygenic differences in age at TV ≥4 mL was strongest in those under chronic stress (10.91, 11.06 and 11.17 years for high, moderate and low PRS, respectively; F = 100.48, P < 0.0001).

Conclusion

Chronic stress predicts earlier age at pubertal onset in a sex-specific and genetic background-dependent manner. The bioecological G × E model for girls and diathesis stress model for boys in pubertal timing warrants further investigation.

Restricted access

Esben T Vestergaard, Niels Møller, René Frydensbjerg Andersen, Søren Rittig and Jens Otto Lunde Jørgensen

Objective

Acyl ghrelin, which is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, potently stimulates pituitary growth hormone release, and to some degree adrenocorticotropic hormone and prolactin. Ghrelin is also orexigenic and has recently been shown to stimulate renal sodium absorption in rodent models. Increased thirst sensation has been observed as a side effect of acyl ghrelin administration in some human studies. The objective of this clinical trial was to investigate the direct effects of acyl ghrelin on thirst sensation and sodium excretion in hypopituitary patients.

Design

Hypopituitary patients on stable replacement with hydrocortisone and growth hormone were investigated in two double-blind and placebo-controlled crossover studies. The patients received a 5-h intravenous infusion of acyl ghrelin (5 pmol/kg/min in the first study and 1 pmol/kg/min in the second study). Thirst sensation was measured on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). In the second study plasma osmolality, vasopressin, copeptin, water intake, diuresis and urinary excretion of sodium and creatinine were measured.

Results

In the initial study, acyl ghrelin (5 pmol/kg/min) increased thirst sensation (time × treatment analysis of variance for the effect of acyl ghrelin infusion P = 0.003). In the second study acyl ghrelin (1 pmol/kg/min) also increased thirst (P = 0.04) but did not affect urinary excretion of either sodium or water.

Conclusions

We demonstrate that acyl ghrelin infusion increases thirst sensation, without affecting sodium excretion or diuresis in human subjects.

Restricted access

Muhamad Badarna, Ruth Percik, Genya Aharon-Hananel, Inbal Uri and Amit Tirosh

Objective: Patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) have variable prognosis, even with comparable tumor grade and stage. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the prognostic utility of the intrapancreatic PNET anatomical site.

Design: Cohort study based on the Surveillance Epidemiology and End-Results database.

Methods: Patients diagnosed with nonfunctioning PNET between 2004-2015 were compared by anatomic site for disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality, using log-rank test and by multivariable cox regression analysis.

Results: 4171 patients (1,839 women [44.1%], median age strata 60-64 years, range 10-14 to ≥85 years) were included in our analysis. Patients with PNETs located at the head vs. body/tail of the pancreas had comparable tumor diameter, as well as ethnicity, gender and age distributions, but had higher rates of grade III and IV NET (13.2% vs. 6.6%, and 4.4% vs. 1.9%, respectively, p<0.001). NETs located at the head vs. body/tail of pancreas were more likely to be locally advanced (32.2% vs 19.9%) with no difference in distant metastases (36.4% vs. 33.5%, respectively, p<0.001). Patients with NETs of the head vs. body/tail of the pancreas had higher disease-specific mortality risk in univariate (log-rank test, p<0.001) and multivariable analysis (Hazard ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.65, p=0.004). Multivariable analysis for all-cause mortality also showed increased risk for patients with pancreatic head vs. body/tail PNET (HR 1.23, p=0.013).

Conclusions: PNET anatomical location is associated with the mortality risk, and should be considered as a prognostic factor, and as an additional consideration in directing patients management.

Restricted access

Mirela Diana Ilie, Véronique Raverot, François Tronc, Alexandre Vasiljevic, Françoise Borson-Chazot and Gérald Raverot

Context

Cabergoline has been shown to have some effect in the treatment of moderate Cushing’s disease, but its effectiveness in Cushing’s syndrome of ectopic or occult origin remains to be investigated.

Case series

In this case series, cabergoline was used in combination with steroidogenesis inhibitors in nine patients with severe Cushing’s syndrome of ectopic or occult origin. Cabergoline’s effectiveness enabled rapid withdrawal of the steroidogenesis inhibitors and long-term control of the hypercortisolism in three of the cases.

Review of the literature

In the literature, we found only 11 cases of ectopic or occult Cushing’s syndrome treated with dopamine receptor agonists, alone or in combination. Yet of these 11 cases, 10 responded.

Conclusions

Although limited, the existing experience highlights the potential value of cabergoline in the treatment of ectopic or occult Cushing’s syndrome.

Restricted access

Orit Twito, Simona Grozinsky-Glasberg, Sigal Levy, Gideon Bachar, David J Gross, Carlos Benbassat, Alon Rozental and Dania Hirsch

Objective

Multiple clinical, pathological and biochemical variables, including the response to initial treatment, are associated with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) prognosis. Studies that include separate analyses of familial and sporadic MTC patients followed for long period are scarce. This study evaluated the association between baseline clinico-pathologic variables and response to initial treatment and short- and long-term disease outcomes in sporadic and familial MTC.

Methods

Patients treated for MTC at four tertiary medical centers were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and pathological data were collected. The outcomes measured included disease persistence 1 year after diagnosis, disease persistence at last follow-up, disease-related mortality (DRM) and all-cause mortality.

Results

The study enrolled 193 patients (mean age: 48.9 ± 18.7, 44.7% males), of whom 18.1% were familial cases. The mean follow-up period was 10.1 ± 9.4 years (8.5 ± 8.1 in sporadic and 16.9 ± 11.6 in familial MTC). Disease persistence 1-year after diagnosis and at last follow-up was detected in 56.1 and 60.4% patients, respectively. All-cause and DRM were 28.5 and 12.6%, respectively. Extra-thyroidal extension (ETE) and distant metastases (DM) were associated with disease persistence at last follow-up. ETE and DM were also significantly associated with DRM. Complete remission 1 year after diagnosis had high correlation with no evidence of disease at last follow-up (Cramer’s V measure of association 0.884, P < 0.001) and with 100% disease-specific survival (Cramer’s V measure of association 0.38, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Apart from clinico-pathologic parameters, close correlation was found between 1-year status and long-term prognosis. These results underscore the importance of combining classical and dynamic factors for both sporadic and familial MTC prognostication and treatment decision making.

Restricted access

Caroline Øhrstrøm and Filip Krag Knop

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is one of the most common bariatric surgeries. The procedure induces a sustained weight loss together with a reduction in obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes. The effects on postprandial glucose metabolism are evident within days or weeks after surgery - before any weight loss has occurred - and are thought to be achieved by a faster passage of nutrients to the small intestine and ensuing alterations in the secretion of several gastrointestinal hormones, acceleration of glucose absorption and increased insulin secretion. Especially the remarkable increase in postprandial plasma levels of the gut-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) - with not only a potent insulinotropic effect, but also a glucagonostatic effect - is believed to contribute to the metabolic improvements and the early remission of type 2 diabetes seen after RYGB.

Restricted access

Katharina Schilbach, Christina Gar, Andreas Lechner, Shiva Sophia Nicolay, Laura Schwerdt, Michael Haenelt, Jakob Dal, Jens-Otto Lunde Jørgensen, Sylvère Störmann, Jochen Schopohl and Martin Bidlingmaier

Objective

Growth hormone (GH) nadir (GHnadir) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is an important tool in diagnosing acromegaly, but data evaluating the need to adjust cut-offs to biological variables utilizing today's assay methods are scarce. We therefore investigated large cohorts of healthy subjects of both sexes to define normal GHnadir concentrations for a modern, sensitive, 22 kD-GH-specific assay.

Design

Multicenter study with prospective and retrospective cohorts (525 healthy adults: 405 females and 120 males).

Methods

GH concentrations were measured by the IDS-iSYS immunoassay after oral application of 75 g glucose.

Results

GHnadir concentrations (µg/L) were significantly higher in lean and normal weight subjects (group A) compared to overweight and obese subjects (group B); (males (M): A vs B, mean: 0.124 vs 0.065, P = 0.0317; premenopausal females without estradiol-containing OC (OC-EE) (FPRE): A vs B, mean: 0.179 vs 0.092, P < 0.0001; postmenopausal women (FPOST): A vs B, mean: 0.173 vs 0.078, P < 0.0061). Age, glucose metabolism and menstrual cycle had no impact on GHnadir. However, premenopausal females on OC-EE (FPREOC) exhibited significantly higher GHnadir compared to all other groups (all P < 0.0001). BMI had no impact on GHnadir in FPREOC (A vs B, mean: 0.624 vs 0.274, P = 0.1228).

Conclusions

BMI, sex and OC-EE intake are the major determinants for the GHnadir during OGTT in healthy adults. Using a modern sensitive GH assay, GHnadir concentrations in healthy subjects are distinctly lower than cut-offs used in previous guidelines for diagnosis and monitoring of acromegaly.