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Teresa Porcelli, Filippo Maffezzoni, Letizia Chiara Pezzaioli, Andrea Delbarba, Carlo Cappelli and Alberto Ferlin

Male osteoporosis has been neglected for too long time and there is need for a change. This condition is clearly under-estimated, under-diagnosed and under-treated. The diagnosis is often made late in the natural history of the pathology or even after a fracture event. Guidelines on screening politics do not agree whether and when men should be considered, and clinical trials are far less performed in men with respect to women. Actually, most of our knowledge on male osteoporosis, especially regarding treatment, is extrapolate from the female counterpart. Male osteoporosis is frequently secondary to other conditions and often associated with comorbidities. Therefore, identification of specific causes of male osteoporosis is essential to drive a correct and personalized treatment. Moreover, men have more osteoporosis-related complications and higher mortality rate associated with fractures. Furthermore, not only fewer men receive a correct and timely diagnosis, but also fewer men receive adequate treatment, and adherence to therapy is far less in men than in women. Of note, very few studies assessed the effect of antiosteoporotic treatments in men and most of them considered only bone density as primary endpoint. This review focuses on the areas that are still nebulous in male osteoporosis field, from identification of subjects who need to be evaluated for osteoporosis and screening programs dealing with primary prevention to diagnostic procedures for good estimates of bone quantity and quality and precise calculation of fracture risk and personalized treatment that take into account the pathophysiology of osteoporosis.

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Merel M Ruissen, Anne Linde Mak, Ulrich Beuers, Maarten E Tushuizen and Adriaan G Holleboom

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing health problem with a global prevalence of over 25% and prevalence rates of over 60% in high-risk populations. It is considered the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of the development of various liver-associated and cardiometabolic complications. Given the complexity of NAFLD and associated comorbidities and complications, treatment requires interventions from a variety of different healthcare specialties. However, many clinicians are currently insufficiently aware of the potential harm and severity of NAFLD and associated comorbidities, complications and the steps that should be taken when NAFLD is suspected. Recognizing which patients suffer from non-progressive simple steatosis, metabolically active NASH with high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and which patients have a high risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is important. Unfortunately, this can be difficult and guidelines towards the optimal diagnostic and therapeutic approach are ambivalent. Here we review the pathogenesis, diagnostics and treatment of NAFLD and discuss how multidisciplinary care path development could move forward.

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Martin Overgaard, Dorte Glintborg, Henrik Thybo Christesen, Tina Kold Jensen and Marianne Skovsager Andersen

Objective:

Low circulating prolactin is a potential marker of metabolic risk during pregnancy. We aimed to investigate associations between prolactin and glucose status in pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Design:

Prospective observational cohort study. From the Odense Child Cohort, 1497 pregnant women were included.

Methods:

Blood samples were assessed during first, second (prolactin, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)) and third trimester (fasting prolactin, testosterone, HbA1c, insulin, glucose). Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed around gestation week 28 in 350 women with risk factors for GDM and in 272 randomly included women. GDM was defined by 2-h plasma glucose ≥9.0 mmol/L.

Results:

The median (IQR) prolactin increased from 633 (451–829) mIU/L in first–second trimester to 5223 (4151–6127) mIU/L at third trimester. Prolactin was inversely associated with HbA1c in first (r = −0.19, P < 0.001) and third trimester (r = −0.07, P = 0.014). In third trimester, women with GDM (n = 37; 6.0%) had lower prolactin compared to women without GDM (4269 vs 5072 mIU/L, P = 0.004). Third trimester prolactin multiple of the median (MoM) was inversely associated with risk of GDM in multivariate regression analysis (OR 0.30, P = 0.034). PCOS was diagnosed in 10.0% (n = 146). Early pregnancy prolactin MoM was positively associated to PCOS diagnosis (OR 1.38, P = 0.051).

Conclusions:

Low prolactin levels during pregnancy were associated with higher HbA1c and risk of GDM. A diagnosis of PCOS was associated with higher early pregnancy prolactin levels.

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Rolf H H Groenwold and Olaf M Dekkers

The validity of any biomedical study is potentially affected by measurement error or misclassification. It can affect different variables included in a statistical analysis, such as the exposure, the outcome, and confounders, and can result in an overestimation as well as in an underestimation of the relation under investigation. We discuss various aspects of measurement error and argue that often an in-depth discussion is needed to appropriately assess the quality and validity of a study.

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Mario Rotondi, Gloria Groppelli, Laura Croce, Francesco Latrofa, Giuseppe Ancona, Francesca Coperchini, Daniela Pasquali, Carlo Cappelli, Alessandro Fugazza, Valeria Guazzoni, Giorgio Radetti and Luca Chiovato

Objective:

The association between chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) remains controversial. The incidence of DTC increases when screening procedures are implemented, as typically occurs in CAT patients being routinely submitted to thyroid ultrasound (US). The aim of this study was to longitudinally evaluate the long-term development of DTC in patients with CAT.

Design and methods:

A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was designed. For the study, 510 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) with a 10-year follow-up were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups according to the presence (CAT+ NOD+; n = 115) or absence (CAT+ NOD−; n = 395) of co-existent nodules at diagnosis. The main outcome measures were appearance of new thyroid-nodules and development of DTC during follow-up.

Results:

During a 10-year median follow-up period, new thyroid-nodules were detected in 34/115 (29.5%) patients in the CAT+ NOD+ group and in 41/395 (10.3%) in the CAT+ NOD− group (P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that thyroid-volume at diagnosis and belonging to the CAT+ NOD+ group significantly predicted the appearance of a new thyroid nodule during follow-up, independently of baseline age and sex. Among the 75 patients experiencing the appearance of a new nodule, 27 (39%) met the criteria for fine-needle-aspiration-cytology (FNAC). A benign cytological diagnosis was rendered in all cases.

Conclusions:

In our series of CAT patients, the appearance of new thyroid-nodules was frequent, but none of them were found to be malignant. The presence of CAT appears to be associated with a negligible risk of developing clinically overt DTC.

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Marco Castellana, Giorgio Grani, Maija Radzina, Vito Guerra, Luca Giovanella, Maurilio Deandrea, Rose Ngu, Cosimo Durante and Pierpaolo Trimboli

Objective:

Several thyroid imaging reporting and data systems (TIRADS) have been proposed to stratify the malignancy risk of thyroid nodule by ultrasound. The TIRADS by the European Thyroid Association, namely EU-TIRADS, was the last one to be published.

Design:

We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the prevalence of malignancy in each EU-TIRADS class and the performance of EU-TIRADS class 5 vs 2, 3 and 4 in detecting malignant lesions.

Methods:

Four databases were searched until December 2019. Original articles reporting the performance of EU-TIRADS and adopting histology as reference standard were included. The number of malignant nodules in each class and the number of nodules classified as true/false positive/negative were extracted. A random-effects model was used for pooling data.

Results:

Seven studies were included, evaluating 5672 thyroid nodules. The prevalence of malignancy in each EU-TIRADS class was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.0–1.3), 5.9% (95% CI: 2.6–9.2), 21.4% (95% CI: 11.1–31.7), and 76.1% (95% CI: 63.7–88.5). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, LR− and DOR of EU-TIRADS class 5 were 83.5% (95% CI: 74.5–89.8), 84.3% (95% CI: 66.2–93.7), 76.1% (95% CI: 63.7–88.5), 85.4% (95% CI: 79.1–91.8), 4.9 (95% CI: 2.9–8.2), 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1–0.3), and 24.5 (95% CI: 11.7–51.0), respectively. A further improved performance was found after excluding two studies because of limited sample size and low prevalence of malignancy in class 5.

Conclusions:

A limited number of studies generally conducted using a retrospective design was found. Acknowledging this limitation, the performance of EU-TIRADS in stratifying the risk of thyroid nodules was high. Also, EU-TIRADS class 5 showed moderate evidence of detecting malignant lesions.

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Anke Tönjes, Annett Hoffmann, Susan Kralisch, Abdul Rashid Qureshi, Nora Klöting, Markus Scholz, Dorit Schleinitz, Anette Bachmann, Jürgen Kratzsch, Marcin Nowicki, Sabine Paeschke, Kerstin Wirkner, Cornelia Enzenbach, Ronny Baber, Joachim Beige, Matthias Anders, Ingolf Bast, Matthias Blüher, Peter Kovacs, Markus Löffler, Ming-Zhi Zhang, Raymond C. Harris, Peter Stenvinkel, Michael Stumvoll, Mathias Fasshauer and Thomas Ebert

Background:

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high risk of premature cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and show increased mortality. Pro-neurotensin (Pro-NT) was associated with metabolic diseases and predicted incident CVD and mortality. However, Pro-NT regulation in CKD and its potential role linking CKD and mortality have not been investigated, so far.

Methods:

In a central lab, circulating Pro-NT was quantified in three independent cohorts comprising 4715 participants (cohort 1: patients with CKD; cohort 2: general population study; and cohort 3: non-diabetic population study). Urinary Pro-NT was assessed in part of the patients from cohort 1. In a 4th independent cohort, serum Pro-NT was further related to mortality in patients with advanced CKD. Tissue-specific Nts expression was further investigated in two mouse models of diabetic CKD and compared to non-diabetic control mice.

Results:

Pro-NT significantly increased with deteriorating renal function (P < 0.001). In meta-analysis of cohorts 1–3, Pro-NT was significantly and independently associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P ≤ 0.002). Patients in the middle/high Pro-NT tertiles at baseline had a higher all-cause mortality compared to the low Pro-NT tertile (Hazard ratio: 2.11, P = 0.046). Mice with severe diabetic CKD did not show increased Nts mRNA expression in different tissues compared to control animals.

Conclusions:

Circulating Pro-NT is associated with impaired renal function in independent cohorts comprising 4715 subjects and is related to all-cause mortality in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Our human and rodent data are in accordance with the hypotheses that Pro-NT is eliminated by the kidneys and could potentially contribute to increased mortality observed in patients with CKD.

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Ola Nilsson

Short stature is one of the most common causes for referrals to pediatric endocrinologists. However, in a majority of the children, no underlying cause can be identified and the child instead receives the unhelpful diagnosis of idiopathic short stature (ISS), often after extensive work-up and testing. Recent advances in genetic methodology have allowed for the identification of a number of different monogenic conditions within the large cohort of ISS children. Isolated short stature and advanced bone age, with or without early-onset osteoarthritis and/or osteochondritis dissecans (MIM#165800) due to heterozygous aggrecan gene mutations exemplifies how this progress is changing the way we assess, counsel and treat children with non-endocrine growth disorders.

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Mischa de Ridder, Els Nieveen van Dijkum, Anton Engelsman, Ellen Kapiteijn, Heinz-Josef Klümpen and Coen R N Rasch

Objective

To perform a nationwide population based study in ATC on incidence, treatment and survival.

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Methods

All patients with primary ATC between 1989 and 2016 were identified in the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Of all these patients excerpts from the pathology reports from PALGA: Dutch Pathology registry were linked to the data of the NCR. Standardized incidences were calculated, survival was estimated using Kaplan–Meier method and univariable statistically significant factors were included in a multivariable regression model.

Results

In total, 812 patients were included. Mean standardized incidence rates were 0.18/100 000 (range 0.11–0.27/100 000) with a significant trend over the years with an estimated annual percentage change of 1.3% per year (95% CI 0.4–2.1%). Median overall survival was 2.2 months, and estimated 1-year survival was 12%. Patients without distant metastases at diagnosis had an estimated 1-year survival of 21.6%. Prognostic factors for prolonged survival were double or triple therapy, age below 65 years, M0-status and absence of bilateral lymph node metastases.

Conclusions

ATC is rare, but often lethal, form of thyroid cancer, with a median survival of 2 months and 1-year survival of approximately 10%. The incidence is slightly rising in the Netherlands over the past 3 decades. There appears to be a subgroup of patients that survive longer, mainly those with relatively limited disease who underwent double or triple therapy. Further research is needed to define these patients more distinctively.

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Saskia le Cessie, Jelle J Goeman and Olaf M Dekkers