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Denise Rockstroh, Heike Pfäffle, Diana Le Duc, Franziska Rößler, Franziska Schlensog-Schuster, John T Heiker, Jürgen Kratzsch, Wieland Kiess, Johannes R Lemke, Rami Abou Jamra and Roland Pfäffle

Objective

The IGF/IGF1R axis is involved in the regulation of human growth. Both IGF1 and IGF2 can bind to the IGF1R in order to promote growth via the downstream PI3K/AKT pathway. Pathogenic mutations in IGF1 and IGF1R determine intrauterine growth restriction and affect postnatal body growth. However, to date, there are only few reports of pathogenic IGF2 mutations causing severe prenatal, as well as postnatal growth retardation.

Results

Here we describe a de novo c.195delC IGF2 variant (NM_000612, p.(Ile66Serfs*93)) in a 4-year-old patient with severe pre- and post-natal growth retardation in combination with dystrophy, facial dimorphism, finger deformities, as well as a patent ductus. Cloning and sequencing of a long-range PCR product harboring the deletion and a SNP informative site chr11:2153634 (rs680, NC_000011.9:g.2153634T>C) demonstrated that the variant resided on the paternal allele. This finding is consistent with the known maternal imprinting of IGF2. 3D protein structure prediction and overexpression studies demonstrated that the p.(Ile66Serfs*93) IGF2 gene variation resulted in an altered protein structure that impaired ligand/receptor binding and thus prevents IGF1R activation.

Conclusion

The severity of the phenotype in combination with the dominant mode of transmission provides further evidence for the involvement of IGF2 in growth disorders.

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Alejandro García-Castaño, Leire Madariaga, Gustavo Pérez de Nanclares, Gema Ariceta, Sonia Gaztambide, Luis Castaño and Spanish Endocrinology Group and Renal Tube Group

Objective

Molecular diagnosis is a useful diagnostic tool in calcium metabolism disorders. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is known to play a central role in the regulation of extracellular calcium homeostasis. We performed clinical, biochemical and genetic characterization of sequence anomalies in this receptor in a cohort of 130 individuals from 82 families with suspected alterations in the CASR gene, one of the largest series described.

Methods

The CASR gene was screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct Sanger sequencing.

Results

Presumed CaSR-inactivating mutations were found in 65 patients from 26 families. These patients had hypercalcemia (median: 11.3 mg/dL) but normal or abnormally high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (median: 52 pg/mL). On the other hand, presumed CaSR-activating mutations were detected in 17 patients from eight families. These patients had a median serum calcium level of 7.4 mg/dL and hypoparathyroidism (median: PTH 13 pg/mL). Further, common polymorphisms previously associated with high blood ionized calcium levels were found in 27 patients (median calcium: 10.6 mg/dL; median PTH: 65 pg/mL) with no other alterations in CASR. Overall, we found 30 different mutations, of which, 14 have not been previously reported (p.Ala26Ser, p.Cys60Arg, p.Lys119Ile, p.Leu123Met, p.Glu133Val, p.Gly222Glu, p.Phe351Ile, p.Cys542Tyr, p.Cys546Gly, p.Cys677Tyr, p.Ile816Val, p.Ala887Asp, p.Glu934*, p.Pro935_Gln945dup).

Conclusions

Patients with CASR mutations may not fit the classic clinical pictures of hypercalcemia with hypocalciuria or hypocalcemia with hypercalciuria. Molecular studies are important for confirming the diagnosis and distinguishing it from other entities. Our genetic analysis confirmed CaSR disorders in 82 patients in the study cohort.

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Carmela Iglesias Felip, Carles Zafon Llopis, Jordi Temprana-Salvador, Amparo García-Burillo, Xavier Serres Créixams, Enric Caubet Busquet, Isabel Roca Bielsa, Jordi Mesa Manteca, Joan Castell Conesa, José Manuel Fort López-Barajas, Ricardo Pujol-Borrell, Santiago Ramon y Cajal Agüeras and Oscar González López

Objective

Lymphadenectomy in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is controversial. It is indicated whenever metastases have been proven before or during surgery and as a prophylactic treatment in high-risk patients. However, 30–50% of cN0 patients become pN1 postoperatively. In PTC, selective-sentinel-lymph-node-biopsy (SLNB) with conventional intraoperative analysis is 8% false negative. One-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a molecular technique which allows real-time detection of mRNA encoding for cytokeratin 19. OSNA has been introduced in intraoperative analysis of several tumors to reduce false-negative rates and distinguish micrometastasis from macrometastasis. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of the introduction of OSNA in the intraoperative evaluation of the sentinel node (SN) in PTC.

Design

We analyzed a series of 35 patients subjected to SLNB.

Methods

All the dissected nodes, SN and non-SN, were evaluated with OSNA and cytology.

Results

We obtained a total of 110 SN. SLNB proved positive in 14 patients (40%) with cytology and in 23 (65.7%) with OSNA (P < 0.001). In the 29 patients with subsequent lymphadenectomy we obtained 360 lymph nodes ((52 positive in cytology (14.4%) and 107 in OSNA (29.7%)). Lymphadenectomy proved positive in 16 patients according to cytology (55%) and in 24 according to OSNA (83%) (P = 0002). The majority of patients with micrometastasis in SN showed only micrometastasis in lymphadenectomy.

Conclusions

The present study shows selective-sentinel-lymph-node-biopsy with one-step nucleic acid amplification technique to be feasible in papillary thyroid carcinoma. The quantitative nature of one-step nucleic acid amplification paves the way toward a more personalized surgical approach, limiting lymphadenectomy to patients with intraoperative evidence of macrometastasis in the sentinel node.

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Ashley Grossman

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Mark R Postma, Thalijn L C Wolters, Gerrit van den Berg, Antonius E van Herwaarden, Anneke C Muller Kobold, Wim J Sluiter, Margreet A Wagenmakers, Alfons C M van den Bergh, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Ad R M M Hermus, Romana T Netea-Maier and André P van Beek

Objective

To assess the effect of somatostatin analogs (SSAs) on mortality in relation to disease control of acromegaly after pituitary surgery.

Design

A retrospective study in two large tertiary referral centers in The Netherlands.

Methods

Overall, 319 patients with acromegaly in whom pituitary surgery was performed as primary therapy between January 1980 and July 2017 were included. Postoperative treatment with SSA was prescribed to 174 (55%) patients because of persistent or recurrent disease. Disease control at last visit was assessed by IGF1 standard deviation score (SDS). Adequate disease control was defined as IGF1 SDS ≤2. Univariate determinants of mortality and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for groups with and without SSA at any moment postoperatively and at last visit.

Results

In total, 27 deaths were observed. In univariate analysis, determinants of mortality were inadequate disease control (relative risk (RR): 3.41, P = 0.005), surgery by craniotomy (RR: 3.53, P = 0.013) and glucocorticoid substitution (RR: 2.11, P = 0.047). There was a strong trend toward increased mortality for patients who used SSA (RR: 2.01, P = 0.067) and/or dopamine agonists (RR: 2.54, P = 0.052) at last visit. The SMR of patients with adequate disease control who used SSA at any moment postoperatively (1.07, P = 0.785) and at last visit (1.19; P = 0.600) was not increased. Insufficiently controlled patients had a significantly raised SMR (3.92, P = 0.006).

Conclusions

Postoperative use of SSA is not associated with increased mortality in patients with acromegaly who attain adequate disease control. In contrast, inadequate disease control, primary surgery by craniotomy and glucocorticoid substitution are associated with increased mortality.

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Adriana G Ioachimescu, Maria Fleseriu, Andrew R Hoffman, T Brooks Vaughan III and Laurence Katznelson

Background

Dopamine agonists (DAs) are the main treatment for patients with hyperprolactinemia and prolactinomas. Recently, an increasing number of reports emphasized DAs’ psychological side effects, either de novo or as exacerbations of prior psychiatric disease.

Methods

Review of prospective and retrospective studies (PubMed 1976, September 2018) evaluating the psychological profile of DA-treated patients with hyperprolactinemia and prolactinomas. Case series and case reports of psychiatric complications were also reviewed.

Results

Most studies were cross-sectional and had a control group of healthy volunteers or patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. There were few prospective studies, with/without control group, that included small numbers of patients. Compared with controls, patients with hyperprolactinemia generally had worse quality of life, anxiety, depression and certain personality traits. Patients receiving DAs had higher impulsivity scores than normoprolactinemic controls. Impulse control disorders (ICDs) were reported in both genders, with hypersexuality mostly in men. Multiple ICDs were sometimes reported in the same patient, usually reversible after DA discontinuation. In case reports, DA therapy was temporally associated with severe depression, manic episodes or psychosis, which improved after discontinuation and administration of psychiatric medications. Gender type of DA, dose and duration of therapy did not correlate with occurrence of psychiatric pathology.

Conclusion

Patients with hyperprolactinemia receiving DAs may develop changes in mood and behavior regardless of prior psychiatric history. Increased awareness for ICDs, depression, mania and other types of psychosis is needed by all physicians who prescribe DAs. Larger prospective controlled clinical studies are needed to delineate prevalence, risk stratification and management.

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Maurilio Deandrea, Francesca Garino, Mormile Alberto, Roberto Garberoglio, Ruth Rossetto, Nadia Bonelli, Stefano Spiezia, Massimo De Santis, Salvatore Monti, Maria Grazia Deiana, Toscano Vincenzo, Christian Cugini, Ghassan El Dalati and Paolo Piero Limone

Background

The purpose of this study was to confirm the generalisation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules (BTN) and to look for a correlation between final shrinkage and some ultrasound (US) findings in a large Italian population data set.

Methods

This prospective study included 337 patients with solid cold BTN from six Italian institutions. Nodule volume, US pattern, thyroid function, symptom/cosmetic scores and complications were evaluated before treatment and at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was to find a correlation between basal volume and US pattern of the nodules and final shrinkage. The secondary outcome was to confirm the efficacy and safety of RFA in a large data set.

Results

The median basal volume was 20.7 mL, and this significantly decreased after RFA at 6 months (7.3 mL (−63.5%), P < 0.001) and at 12 months (6 mL (−70%), P vs 6 months = 0.009). A significant correlation was found for US structure (a spongiform pattern showing a 76% reduction vs 67 and 66% of mix and solid patterns respectively, P < 0.01) as well as for vascularity (intense peripheral and intranodal patterns showing 71 vs 68 and 67% of weak peripheral and intranodal and peripheral patterns respectively, P < 0.03), but not for macrocalcifications. A slight inverse correlation was found between nodule basal volume and shrinkage (Spearman: −0.23). Mean symptoms/cosmetic scores were significantly reduced. No major complications were encountered.

Conclusions

This multicentre study validated the efficacy and safety of RFA for treating BTN and showed a clear correlation between final shrinkage and some common US findings.

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Yijie Xu, Haibin Li, Anxin Wang, Zhaoping Su, Guang Yang, Yanxia Luo, Lixin Tao, Shuohua Chen, Shouling Wu, Youxin Wang and Xiuhua Guo

Objective

This study aimed to determine if the metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in Chinese population.

Design

The Kailuan study is a community-based prospective cohort study.

Methods

BMI and metabolic syndrome (MetS) were assessed in 91 866 participants without a history of MI or stroke. Participants were categorised into six mutually exclusive groups according to the BMI-MetS status: normal weight (BMI:  ≤ 18.5to < 24.0 kg/m2) without MetS (MH-NW), normal weight with MetS (MUH-NW), overweight (BMI:  ≤ 24.0to < 28.0 kg/m2) without MetS (MH-OW), overweight with MetS (MUH-OW), obese (BMI ≥ 28.0 kg/m2) without MetS (MHO) and obese with MetS (MUO). The hazard ratio (HR) with 95% CI was calculated for the incidence of MI using a multivariable Cox model.

Results

A total of 6745 (7.34%) individuals were classified as MHO. During a median 8-year follow-up, 1167 (1.27%) participants developed MI. The MHO group had an increased risk of MI (HR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.37–2.25) in comparison with the MH-NW group after adjusting for potential confounding variables. After a similar adjustment, the risk of MI was significantly elevated in the MUH-NW (HR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.28–2.05), MUH-OW (HR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.67–2.35) and MUO group (HR: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.70–2.49).

Conclusions

MHO subjects showed a substantially higher risk of MI in comparison with MH-NW subjects. That said, even without measurable metabolic abnormalities, obesity was associated with a higher risk of MI.

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C Peters, A S P van Trotsenburg and N Schoenmakers

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may be primary, due to a defect affecting the thyroid gland itself, or central, due to impaired thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-mediated stimulation of the thyroid gland as a result of hypothalamic or pituitary pathology. Primary CH is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder, traditionally subdivided into thyroid dysgenesis (TD), referring to a spectrum of thyroid developmental abnormalities, and dyshormonogenesis, where a defective molecular pathway for thyroid hormonogenesis results in failure of hormone production by a structurally intact gland. Delayed treatment of neonatal hypothyroidism may result in profound neurodevelopmental delay; therefore, CH is screened for in developed countries to facilitate prompt diagnosis. Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) is a rarer entity which may occur in isolation, or (more frequently) in association with additional pituitary hormone deficits. CCH is most commonly defined biochemically by failure of appropriate TSH elevation despite subnormal thyroid hormone levels and will therefore evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based CH-screening programmes. This review will discuss recent genetic aetiological advances in CH and summarize epidemiological data and clinical diagnostic challenges, focussing on primary CH and isolated CCH.

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Gunn-Helen Moen, Marissa LeBlanc, Christine Sommer, Rashmi B Prasad, Tove Lekva, Kjersti R Normann, Elisabeth Qvigstad, Leif Groop, Kåre I Birkeland, David M Evans and Kathrine F Frøslie

Objective

Hyperglycaemia during pregnancy increases the risk of adverse health outcomes in mother and child, but the genetic aetiology is scarcely studied. Our aims were to (1) assess the overlapping genetic aetiology between the pregnant and non-pregnant population and (2) assess the importance of genome-wide polygenic contributions to glucose traits during pregnancy, by exploring whether genetic risk scores (GRSs) for fasting glucose (FG), 2-h glucose (2hG), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and BMI in non-pregnant individuals were associated with glucose measures in pregnant women.

Methods

We genotyped 529 Norwegian pregnant women and constructed GRS from known genome-wide significant variants and SNPs weakly associated (p > 5 × 10−8) with FG, 2hG, BMI and T2D from external genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and examined the association between these scores and glucose measures at gestational weeks 14–16 and 30–32. We also performed GWAS of FG, 2hG and shape information from the glucose curve during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT).

Results

GRSFG explained similar variance during pregnancy as in the non-pregnant population (~5%). GRSBMI and GRST2D explained up to 1.3% of the variation in the glucose traits in pregnancy. If we included variants more weakly associated with these traits, GRS2hG and GRST2D explained up to 2.4% of the variation in the glucose traits in pregnancy, highlighting the importance of polygenic contributions.

Conclusions

Our results suggest overlap in the genetic aetiology of FG in pregnant and non-pregnant individuals. This was less apparent with 2hG, suggesting potential differences in postprandial glucose metabolism inside and outside of pregnancy.