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A Calabrese, V Basile, S Puglisi, P Perotti, A Pia, L Saba, P Berchialla, F Porpiglia, A Veltri, M Volante, G Reimondo, A Berruti and M Terzolo

Objective

Many patients with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) suffer from tumor recurrence despite radical surgery. Evidence on the post-operative use of mitotane is controversial and no predictors of response are available. We aimed to assess whether adjuvant mitotane treatment may prolong survival in patients with non-metastatic ACC following complete resection and whether ACC patients at high risk of recurrence may benefit from treatment.

Design and methods

We retrospectively reviewed data from 152 non-metastatic ACC patients followed at the San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital: 100 patients were treated with adjuvant mitotane and 52 patients were left untreated following surgery. We assessed a number of potential predictive factors of recurrence and death. Mitotane effect was explored stratifying patients by staging (stage I–II vs stage III), hormone secretion (yes vs no) and Ki67 index.

Results

The non-treated group had a higher risk of recurrence (HR: 2.79, 95%CI: 1.58–4.91; P < 0.001) than mitotane-treated group, while overall survival was not significantly different between groups. Hormone secretion, elevated Weiss score and elevated Ki67 index confer a higher risk of both recurrence and death and stage III ACC of death. Adjuvant mitotane treatment reduced significantly the risk of death in patients with elevated Ki67 index (P = 0.005) and in patients with stage III ACC (P = 0.02).

Conclusions

Adjuvant mitotane may prolong recurrence-free survival in radically resected ACC patients with acceptable toxicity and may also prolong overall survival in a subgroup of ACC patients at high risk of recurrence.

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Laura Dauben, Marie-Christine Simon, Klaus Strassburger, Volker Burkart, Katharina S Weber, Sven Schinner, Michael Roden and Karsten Müssig

Objective

Insulinomas are rare pancreatic endocrine tumors characterized by hypoglycemia. Guidelines by the Endocrine Society (ES), the European (ENETS) and the North American (NANETS) Neuroendocrine Tumor Societies provide divergent diagnostic criteria. This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of these different criteria during the 72-h fasting test.

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Methods

From 2000 to 2014, 64 patients with a suspected insulinoma underwent a 72-h fasting test and were included in the analysis. This study assessed the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy based on venous blood glucose and corresponding insulin levels measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA).

Results

Based on 64 individuals (18 with, 46 without insulinoma), the ES criteria provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 0.94 (0.73–1.00), specificity of 0.89 (0.76–0.96) and accuracy of 0.91 (0.81–0.96). ENETS/NANETS criteria reached a diagnostic sensitivity of 0.78 (0.52–0.94), specificity of 1.00 (0.92–1.00) and accuracy of 0.94 (0.85–0.98).

Conclusions

These results point to a higher diagnostic sensitivity with less specificity for diagnosing insulinoma using ES criteria and a higher specificity at lower sensitivity by using ENETS/NANETS criteria. Before considering these results when applying the different criteria in clinical practice, the results should be confirmed in further studies comprising larger cohorts.

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Eberhard Nieschlag and Susan Nieschlag

As the most important male hormone, testosterone has an impact on almost all organs and body functions. The biological effects of testosterone and the testes have been known since antiquity, long before testosterone was identified as the active agent. Practical applications of this knowledge were castration of males to produce obedient servants, for punishment, for preservation of the prepubertal soprano voice and even for treatment of diseases. Testes were used in organotherapy and transplanted as treatment for symptoms of hypogonadism on a large scale, although these practices had only placebo effects. In reaction to such malpractice in the first half of the 20th century science and the young pharmaceutical industry initiated the search for the male hormone. After several detours together with their teams in 1935, Ernst Laqueur (Amsterdam) isolated and Adolf Butenandt (Gdansk) as well as Leopold Ruzicka (Zürich) synthesized testosterone. Since then testosterone has been available for clinical use. However, when given orally, testosterone is inactivated in the liver, so that parenteral forms of administration or modifications of the molecule had to be found. Over 85 years the testosterone preparations have been slowly improved so that now physiological serum levels can be achieved.

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Chin-Hsiao Tseng

Background

Whether metformin might affect the risk of benign nodular goiter in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated.

Methods

Patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus during 1999–2005 were enrolled from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database. Analyses were conducted in a propensity score matched-pairs of 20,048 ever users and 20,048 never users of metformin. The patients were followed until December 31, 2011, for the incidence of benign nodular goiter. Hazard ratios were estimated by Cox regression incorporated with the inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score.

Results

Among the never users and ever users of metformin, 392 and 221 cases were diagnosed of benign nodular goiter during follow-up, with incidence of 457.88 and 242.45 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The overall hazard ratio for ever versus never users was 0.527 (95% confidence interval: 0.447–0.621). When cumulative duration of metformin therapy was divided into tertiles, the hazard ratios for the first (<25.3 months), second (25.3–57.3 months) and third (>57.3 months) tertiles were 0.815 (0.643–1.034), 0.648 (0.517–0.812) and 0.255 (0.187–0.348), respectively. Sensitivity analyses estimating the overall hazard ratios for patients enrolled in each specific year from 1999 to 2005 consistently showed a lower risk of benign nodular goiter among users of metformin.

Conclusion

Metformin use is associated with a lower risk of benign nodular goiter in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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Jordan Sibeoni, Emilie Manolios, Laurence Verneuil, Philipe Chanson and Anne Revah-Levy

Context

Acromegaly has a substantial diagnostic delay associated with an increased risk of comorbidities and psychosocial deterioration. Qualitative methods which focus on the ways that individuals understand and relate to what they are experiencing are the best methods for exploring patients’ perspectives. To the best of our knowledge, they have not been developed in the context of acromegaly.

Objectives

This study aimed to explore the experience of the diagnostic pathway of patients with acromegaly.

Design

We conducted a qualitative study, based on 20 face-to-face unstructured interviews in a third referral Endocrinology center. Participants, purposively selected until data saturation, were patients with acromegaly with diverse disease durations, types of treatment or associated comorbidities. The data were examined by thematic analysis.

Results

Our analysis found four themes: (i) what happened for patients before the diagnosis; (ii) what happened after; (iii) the style or type of doctor involved and (iv) patients’ suggestions for limiting diagnostic delay. Our findings underlined the direct associations between diagnostic delay and the doctor–patient encounter, and the truly catastrophic experience of this disease, both before and after the diagnosis.

Conclusions

Diagnosis of acromegaly requires active medical involvement and awareness. Intervention of patient-experts in medical schools may help to be more aware of this disease. Endocrinologists caring for patients with acromegaly should also address the catastrophic dimension of the patient’s experience and initiate the narrative to help them to put it into words for preventing harmful consequences such as social isolation and QoL impairment, but also anxiety or depression.

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Maria Othelie Underdal, Øyvind Salvesen, Anne Schmedes, Marianne Skovsager Andersen and Eszter Vanky

Objective

To explore whether gestational prolactin and breast increase are markers of metabolic health in pregnancy and on long-term, in PCOS.

Design

Follow-up study. Women with PCOS, according to the Rotterdam criteria (n = 239), former participants of the randomized controlled trial (RCT) PregMet were invited, 131 participated in the current follow-up study, at mean 8 years after pregnancy.

Methods

Metformin 2000 mg/day or placebo from first trimester to delivery in the original RCT. No intervention in the current study.

Prolactin was analyzed in the first trimester and at gestational week 32 and metabolic characteristics which are part of the metabolic syndrome and measures of glucose homeostasis were examined. Metabolic health was also evaluated according to breast increase versus lack of breast increase during pregnancy.

Results

Prolactin increase in pregnancy was negatively correlated to BMI (P = 0.007) and systolic blood pressure (P ≤ 0.001) in gestational week 32. Prolactin at gestational week 32 was negatively correlated to BMI (P = 0.044) and visceral fat area (P = 0.028) at 8-year follow-up in an unadjusted model. Prolactin at gestational week 32 showed no associations to metabolic health at follow-up when baseline BMI was adjusted for. Women who reported lack of breast increase during pregnancy, had higher BMI (P = 0.034), waist-hip ratio (P = 0.004), visceral fat area (P = 0.050), total cholesterol (P = 0.022), systolic (P = 0.027) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.011) at 8-year follow-up.

Conclusion

High prolactin levels and breast increase in pregnancy were associated with a more favorable long-term metabolic health in women with PCOS. Both prolactin and breast increase may be mediated by gestational BMI.

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Katrien Benhalima, Paul Van Crombrugge, Carolien Moyson, Johan Verhaeghe, Sofie Vandeginste, Hilde Verlaenen, Chris Vercammen, Toon Maes, Els Dufraimont, Christophe De Block, Yves Jacquemyn, Farah Mekahli, Katrien De Clippel, Annick Van Den Bruel, Anne Loccufier, Annouschka Laenen, Caro Minschart, Roland Devlieger and Chantal Mathieu

Objective

Since many European countries use risk factor screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), we aimed to determine the performance of selective screening for GDM based on the 2013 WHO criteria.

Design and methods

Overall, 1811 women received universal screening with a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with GDM in 12.5% (n = 231) women based on the 2013 WHO criteria. We retrospectively applied different European selective screening guidelines to this cohort and evaluated the performance of different clinical risk factors to screen for GDM.

Results

By retrospectively applying the English, Irish, French and Dutch guidelines for selective screening, respectively 28.5% (n = 526), 49.7% (n = 916), 48.5% (n = 894) and 50.7% (n = 935) had at least one risk factor, with GDM prevalence of respectively 6.5% (n = 120), 7.9% (n = 146), 8.0% (n = 147) and 8.4% (n = 154). Using maternal age ≥30 and/or BMI ≥25 for screening, positive rate was 69.9% (n = 1288), GDM prevalence 10.2% (n = 188), sensitivity 81.4% (CI: 75.8–86.2%) and specificity 31.8% (CI: 29.5–34.1%). Adding other clinical risk factors did not improve detection. GDM women without risk factors had more neonatal hypoglycemia (14.4 vs 4.0%, P = 0.001) and labor inductions (39.7 vs 25.9%, P = 0.020) than normal-glucose tolerant women, and less cesarean sections than GDM women with risk factors (13.8 vs 31.0%, P = 0.010).

Conclusions

By applying selective screening by European guidelines, about 50% of women would need an OGTT with the lowest number of missed cases (33%) by the Dutch guidelines. Screening with age ≥30 years and/or BMI ≥25, reduced the number of missed cases to 18.6% but 70% would need an OGTT.

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Elodie Fiot, Delphine Zénaty, Priscilla Boizeau, Jérémie Haignere, Sophie Dos Santos, Juliane Léger and the French Turner Syndrome Study Group

Objective

Turner Syndrome is associated with several phenotypic conditions associated with a higher risk of subsequent comorbidity. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of congenital malformations and the occurrence of age-related comorbid conditions and to determine whether the frequencies of congenital and acquired conditions depend on X chromosome gene dosage, as a function of karyotype subgroup.

Design and methods

This national retrospective observational cohort study includes 1501 patients. We evaluated the prevalence of congenital malformations and the cumulative incidence of subsequent specific comorbidities at five-year intervals, from the ages of 10 to 30 years, with stratification by karyotype subgroup: 45,X (n = 549), 45,X/46,isoXq (n = 280), 46,X,r(X)/46,XX (n = 106), 45,X/46,XX (n = 221), presence of Y (n = 87).

Results

Median age was 9.4 (3.7–13.7) years at first evaluation and 16.8 (11.2–21.4) years at last evaluation. Congenital heart (18.9%) malformations were more frequent in 45,X patients, and congenital renal (17.2%) malformations were more frequent in 45,X, 45,X/46,isoXq and 46,X,r(X)/46,XX patients than in those with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism or a Y chromosome (P < 0.0001). The cumulative incidence of subsequent acquired conditions, such as thyroid disease, hearing loss, overweight/obesity, dyslipidemia and, to a lesser extent, celiac disease, glucose intolerance/type 2 diabetes, hypertension and liver dysfunction increased with age, but less markedly for patients with mosaicism than for those with other karyotypes. Patients with a ring chromosome were more prone to metabolic disorders.

Conclusion

These data suggest that X gene chromosome dosage, particularly for Xp genes, contributes to the risk of developing comorbidities.

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Sergio Valdés, Viyey Doulatram-Gamgaram, Ana Lago, Francisca García Torres, Rocío Badía-Guillén, Gabriel Olveira, Albert Goday, Alfonso Calle-Pascual, Luis Castaño, Conxa Castell, Elías Delgado, Edelmiro Menendez, Josep Franch-Nadal, Sonia Gaztambide, Joan Girbés, Ramón Gomis, Emilio Ortega, José L Galán-García, Gabriel Aguilera-Venegas, Federico Soriguer and Gemma Rojo-Martínez

Objective

The activity of brown adipose tissue is sensitive to changes in ambient temperature. A lower exposure to cold could result in an increased risk of developing diabetes at population level, although this factor has not yet been sufficiently studied.

Design

We studied 5072 subjects, participants in a national, cross-sectional population-based study representative of the Spanish adult population (Di@bet.es study). All subjects underwent a clinical, demographic and lifestyle survey, a physical examination and blood sampling (75 g oral glucose tolerance test). Insulin resistance was estimated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). The mean annual temperature (°C) in each individual municipality was collected from the Spanish National Meteorology Agency.

Results

Linear regression analysis showed a significant positive association between mean annual temperature and fasting plasma glucose (β: 0.087, P < 0.001), 2 h plasma glucose (β: 0.049, P = 0.008) and HOMA-IR (β: 0.046, P = 0.008) in multivariate adjusted models. Logistic regression analyses controlled by multiple socio-demographic variables, lifestyle, adiposity (BMI) and geographical elevation showed increasing odds ratios for prediabetes (WHO 1999), ORs 1, 1.26 (0.95–1.66), 1.08 (0.81–1.44) and 1.37 (1.01–1.85) P for trend = 0.086, diabetes (WHO 1999) ORs 1, 1.05 (0.79–1.39), 1.20 (0.91–1.59) and 1.39 (1.02–1.90) P = 0.037, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR ≥75th percentile of the non-diabetic population): ORs 1, 1.03 (0.82–1.30), 1.22 (0.96–1.55), 1.26 (0.98–1.63) (P for trend = 0.046) as the mean annual temperature (into quartiles) rose.

Conclusions

Our study reports an association between ambient temperature and the prevalence of dysglycemia and insulin resistance in Spanish adults, consistent with the hypothesis that a lower exposure to cold could be associated with a higher risk of metabolic derangements.

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Mario Rotondi, Andrea Carbone, Francesca Coperchini, Rodolfo Fonte and Luca Chiovato

IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is fibro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, systemic disease recognized as a defined clinical condition only in 2001. The prevalence of IgG4-RD is 6/100 000, but it is likely to be underestimated due to insufficient awareness of the disease. The diagnostic approach is complex because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and because of rather variable diagnostic criteria. Indeed, high concentrations of IgG4 in tissue and serum are not a reliable diagnostic marker. The spectrum of IgG4-RD also includes well-known thyroid diseases including Riedel’s thyroiditis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and its fibrotic variant, Graves’ disease and Graves’ orbitopathy. Results from clinical studies indicate that a small subset of patients with the above-mentioned thyroid conditions present some features suggestive for IgG4-RD. However, according to more recent views, the use of the term thyroid disease with an elevation of IgG4 rather than IgG4-related thyroid diseases would appear more appropriate. Nevertheless, the occurrence of high IgG4 levels in patients with thyroid disease is relevant due to peculiarities of their clinical course.