Circulating miR-30b levels increase during male puberty

in European Journal of Endocrinology
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  • 1 New Children’s Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, Pediatric Research Center, Helsinki, Finland
  • 2 Stem Cells and Metabolism Research Program, Research Programs Unit, Helsinki, Finland
  • 3 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Correspondence should be addressed to T Raivio; Email: taneli.raivio@helsinki.fi

*(T Varimo and Y Wang contributed equally to this work)

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Objective

The role of miRNA as endocrine regulators is emerging, and microRNA mir-30b has been reported to repress Mkrn3. However, the expression of miR-30b during male puberty has not been studied.

Design and methods

Circulating relative miR-30b expression was assessed in sera of 26 boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP), treated with low-dose testosterone (T) (n =11) or aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Lz) (n =15) for 6 months and followed up to 12 months (NCT01797718). The associations between the relative expression of miR-30b and hormonal markers of puberty were evaluated.

Results

During the 12 months of the study, circulating miR-30b expression increased 2.4 ± 2.5 (s.d.) fold (P = 0.008) in all boys, but this change did not correlate with corresponding changes in LH, testosterone, inhibin B, FSH, or testicular volume (P = 0.25-0.96). Lz-induced activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis was associated with more variable miR-30b responses at 3 months (P < 0.05), whereas those treated with T exhibited significant changes in relative miR-30b levels in the course the study (P < 0.01–0.05).

Conclusions

Circulating miR-30b expression in boys with CDGP increases in the course of puberty, and appears to be related to the activity of the HPG axis.

 

     European Society of Endocrinology

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