In memoriam: Renato Pasquali (1946–2019)

in European Journal of Endocrinology

Correspondence should be addressed to A Gambineri; Email: alessandra.gambiner3@unibo.it

Figure 1
Figure 1

Professor Renato Pasquali

Citation: European Journal of Endocrinology 182, 3; 10.1530/EJE-19-1063

Professor Renato Pasquali (Fig. 1), who founded the Endocrinology School of Bologna, suddenly and dramatically passed away on December 18, 2019.

He was born in Budrio (Bologna) in 1946 and graduated cum laude from the Medical School at the Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna in 1971. Subsequently, Renato Pasquali initiated his internal medicine training at the Institute of Clinical Medicine, under the enlightened direction of Professors Giuseppe Labò and Luigi Barbara. He used to remember the time spent during those years with enormous zeal and pleasure, deriving awareness that medicine is characterized by methodology and study, as well as passion and empathy. By working in such a stimulating environment, he discovered his great passion for metabolic diseases. Thus, in the beginning he collaborated with Professor Nazario Melchionda and later launched his independent career as an endocrinologist supported by Professor Barbara. Following a substantial amount of work, Professor Renato Pasquali founded the School of Specialization in Endocrinology and the Endocrinology Unit of the S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital of Bologna, which remained under his direction from 1998 until 2016.

His strong belief in both the values of science and committed collaborators resulted in massive clinical and scientific developments in Endocrinology in Bologna and was soon known at a national and international level. He was a man with great and inspiring vision, always targeting a solution for problems. Professor Renato Pasquali, a man of vast culture, had many interests encompassing philosophy, history, art and football. Nevertheless, at the end of the day, his endless passion was always directed towards patients and the complexity of their problems. He had always been a reference for students, due to his tenacity and his conviction that clinical methodology is a primary discipline in medical practice. His strong personality was dominant as well as his deep affection and persistent interest for his team members. His team members recognized his immeasurable skills and were always highly motivated by his impulsive attitude when dealing with patients and science.

During his long-lasting career, Professor Pasquali gained great respect among the endocrine scientific societies that he joined. He published more than 300 articles in international scientific journals. He actively participated in the expert Conference that was organized in Rotterdam in May 2003 by the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) that introduced the ‘Rotterdam criteria’ for the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Further, in 2007 he took part in the Thessaloniki ESHRE/ASRM Sponsored Consensus Workshop that generated the ‘Consensus on infertility treatment’ for the polycystic ovary syndrome. He was a member of the team which, in 2009, generated the Position Statement on Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Society for the treatment of obesity in polycystic ovary syndrome. His scientific input was appreciated worldwide, and in 2009 he contributed to the Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Even after the end of his academic career, he participated in the writing of guidelines for the European Society of Endocrinology on the ‘Endocrine Work-up in Obesity’, which was published in this journal (1). Two years ago, he received the prestigious Clinical Endocrinology Trust prize awarded by the European Society of Endocrinology, in recognition of noteworthy scientific activity in the field of endocrinology.

Beyond work, publications and recognition he received, it is noteworthy to stress his capability to build solid interconnections between apparently distant endocrine topics, perfectly depicted in many of his studies on steroid pathophysiology in different diseases. Thus, Renato Pasquali was one of the first in Europe to adopt mass spectrometry in clinical diagnosis of a large spectrum of diseases in which steroids are of importance. Last, but not the least, very recently Pasquali’s finding of an association between cardiovascular events and adrenal incidentalomas published in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology clearly documented his talented world class clinical research capacity. Recently, he was about to finish a review on the pathophysiology of androgens for a prestigious international endocrine journal. The most recent meeting that he attended took place in Porto in November 2019, the same town where the meeting that gave birth to the European Position Statement on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome was organized in November 2013 and coordinated by him. On that occasion, Renato Pasquali proposed and coordinated one of the most cited papers on polycystic ovary syndrome published in the European Journal of Endocrinology in 2014 (2).

With enormous appreciation, we would like to quote a colleague and a close collaborator of his, who on hearing of his death said, ‘Professor Pasquali was a figure from Renaissance’, brilliantly depicting the style, the elegance, the mastery, the culture and the talent that characterized him. His talent, his culture and wise counsel will be remembered by many clinicians and scientists, especially the large community of Endocrinologists and Gynaecologists who appreciated his supreme integrity and profound generosity in sharing his knowledge and his brilliant and multifaceted visions.

We, the members of the group in Bologna he founded, are deeply indebted to carry on his work, dream and passion with which he inspirited us through his educational system. Despite the huge sadness, we are enormously proud to have had Professor Renato Pasquali as a Master and honoured to have assisted him in the founding of the School of Endocrinology, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna.

References

  • 1

    PasqualiRCasanuevaFHaluzikMvan HulsteijnLLedouxSMonteiroMPSalvadorJSantiniFToplakHDekkersOM. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline: Endocrine work-up in obesity. European Journal of Endocrinology 2020 G1G32. (https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-19-0893)

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  • 2

    ConwayGDewaillyDDiamanti-KandarakisEEscobar-MorrealeHFranksSGambineriAKelestimurFMacutDMicicDPasqualiR et al. The polycystic ovary syndrome: a position statement from the European Society of Endocrinology. European Journal of Endocrinology 2014 P1P29. (https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-14-0253)

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  • 1

    PasqualiRCasanuevaFHaluzikMvan HulsteijnLLedouxSMonteiroMPSalvadorJSantiniFToplakHDekkersOM. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline: Endocrine work-up in obesity. European Journal of Endocrinology 2020 G1G32. (https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-19-0893)

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    ConwayGDewaillyDDiamanti-KandarakisEEscobar-MorrealeHFranksSGambineriAKelestimurFMacutDMicicDPasqualiR et al. The polycystic ovary syndrome: a position statement from the European Society of Endocrinology. European Journal of Endocrinology 2014 P1P29. (https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-14-0253)

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    • Export Citation